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Jne Jdetnanian 

1912 








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MAIN COLLEGE BUILDING 



page Two 



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Page Three 



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We the Editors and Manager of the Bethanian of 1012 
have worked hard on this annual. We beheve it worthy of ad- 
miration in spite of its shortcomings. It is with a certain sense 
of pride that we send it out to the great Bethany Family. It is 
something tangible a reality, to which we can point as being the 
result of our labors. We trust that }'ou will consider it worthy 
to take its place in the slowly growing library of Bethany an- 
nuals. 

Having assumed the responsibility for this book, we believe 
it futile to make apologies for its contents. Any parts that may 
require such, we hope may be regarded with magnanimity b}- our 
readers. 

Following our time honored custom, we have tried to pre- 
sent the Senior and Jimior Classes in their photographical en- 
tirety, a few, out of modesty and others for less laudable reas- 
ons, have never surrendered their "solios." I^ike difficulties 
were experienced in securing desired data, but we beleive the in- 
formation and characterizations accompanying each name arc 
comparatively accurate if not inclusive. 

Bethany offers that true education which is the "symetrical 
development of mind, bod}' and soul." This annual is intended 
to represent the college activities, we have accordingly divided it 
into departments corresponding to the four phases of college 
life — intellectual, religious, social and athletic. 

The Editors wish to take this opportunity to express their 
appreciation to Professors A. R. Bourne, Phillip Johnston, Her- 
man Deutsch, and to Miss Garda Bachell and Henry C. Kiefer, 
for their valuable assistance in preparing this book. 

We have failed in manv points to realize our expectations, 
but we hope that you will receive kindly and consider attentively 
this product of our labors, ever remembering that we have 
been confronted bv man\- difticultics and limitations. 

THE EDITORS, 



Page Fo 




Page Fh 



•^ »^ •^^ 

\'oicing the sincere affection of all whom you have in- 
structed in Bethany College, we, the Senior and Junior Classes, 
gratefully dedicate the Bctlwiiian of 1912 to you 

Mrs. Anna iR. Sourwe- 

In these years of service in Bethany, always adequate to 
the task before you, you have stood unchangingly in the love, 
respect and honor of Bethany's students. 



Page Six 




PROF. ANNA R. BOURNE 



Pa^e Se 



Bethanian Staff 

Editor-in-Chief. 
GEORGE C. HETTLER. 

Assistant Editor. 
J. A. HALL. 

Business Manager. 
HARRY L. ICE. 

Assistant Business Manager. 
J. R. GLENN. 

Literary Editor. 
HELMAS L. MILLER. 

Humorous Editor. 
ENOCH C. SMITH. 

Athletic Editor. 
WILLIAM S. SHUTTLEWORTH 

Art Editors. 

EDGAR A. JOHNSTON 

ELIZABETH M. BUTE 

EARLE E. BLAIR 



Page Eight 




BETHANIAN STAFF 



Page Nil 



The Charm of Bethany 

Prof. A. R. Bourne. 

For many years Bethany was so far away from the world — so remote 
from all that goes to make up the rush and the clang of modern existence — that 
even the Disciples of Christ seemed half inclined to shove her gently into obliv- 
ion and go about more important concerns of church and education. 

True, Bethany was rich in sacred associations. She had great presences 
about her. Quietly camping on her little hillside cemetery were her Campbells 
and her Pendletons and through the long night of her humiliation they pointed 
their white shafts ever toward the stars, registering mute prophesies of things to 
be, prophesies of things which are now coming to pass. For a new Bethany 
is rapidly springing up beside the "Old Bethany" of song and story. 

If you are skeptical, reader, about this new Bethany, get off the train some 
fine day at the little town of Wellsburg, West Virginia, and take the trolley for 
Bethany. Pretty soon you will be speeding through one of the most picturesque 
valleys in this country. As you swing around the curves of a clear little stream, 
glide over the bridges, skim the brink of the precipices, emerge from a tunnel 
or so, you will begin to feel the charm of life in a region where most of the 
world's voices "come softened through all manner of green and tranquil things." 
Soon your car will have leaped the final chasm and landed you in the principal 
street of Bethany. You may be surprised, even though you were one of the 
Centennial pilgrims, to find yourself, not in a sluggish little hamlet, lost in 
dreams of the past, but in the midst of appearances resembling a "Kansas boom." 
What has come over this drowsy little daughter of the hills? Bulidings are ris- 
ing ; a superb new gateway crowns the slope leading to the campus. On every 
side is felt the throb of new life. As you alight from the trolley you will notice 
on your left, where the old "Ranch" used to stand, the Percy Cochran Memorial 
hall, erected to the memory of one of liethany's sons by his father. Judge Coch- 
ran of Uniontown, Pa. 

Just in front of you rises the imposing new gateway a])proached by a spac- 
ious avenue paved with brick, and bordered on each side by a wide strip of green 
sward and concrete paving. The gateway is of Gothic design, the architecture 
of which is wrought out in harmony with Collegiate Gothic of the main college 
buildings. It consists of two hexagonal columns of dark red brick, supported on 
white stone foundation and surmounted by white stone turrets tipped with Goth- 
ic finials. Between these columns is a pair of handsome wrought iron gates. To 
left and right of the colunms is thrown a graceful wing pierced by an arched 
gateway for pedestrians. The tripple gateway opens on a paved court formed 
by a semi-circular excavation in the slope of the hill from wJiich broad flights of 
steps lead in a spiral to a stone platform faced by a stone parapet. From this 
platform the main walk, after passing another flight of steps, rises by a gentle 
slope to the great front door in the center of the building. From the same plat- 
form cement walks, winding to right and left under the trees, approach the 
various other buildings. This entire structure was erected at a cost of $3,000 and 
is the gift of Mr. Earl W. Oglebay of Wheeling, West Virginia, an alumnus of 
the college. 

Pa{ie Ten 



The latest gift of this munificent friend of Bethany is the handsome new 
Hall of Agriculture, rising at the northern end of the college building. It occu- 
pies the site of the wing destroyed some years ago by fire. The spacious Oxford 
window of painted Gothic above the main portals of the building rivalls in 
symmetry and proportion those of European colleges. This, with the fine castel- 
lated tower which so nobly completes the dignity of the whole, sends one's 
thoughts dreaming of Old World legends in stone and story. 

It is to such legacies as this that Bethany is indebted for the charm of her 
name. Our state institutions far and near have rich and costly structures reared 
at the expense of the body politic, and their material equipment is surpassingly 
adequate for the purposes of intellectual training. In Bethany the affections of 
men have slowly grown with the growth of the trees, with the slow lapse of years. 
What Bethany has today of worth is the gift of hearts that love her, loyal sons 
who have held her in reverence, and, after years of success in the marts of busi- 
ness, have returned to honor her with their substance. We have here also gifts 
that speak not only of the sunshine of prosperity but also of sorrow — votive gifts 
to those who come no more. Such are the gifts of men like Thomas W. Phillips 
and jM. M. Cochran. In these Bethany has an inheritance rich beyond the cost 
of brick and stone and sculptured shield. Here sentiment, like a frail "Daphan- 
ous robe'" throws its tender grace over all things — over the college, over the entire 
little valley, couching in the embrace of the hills to the soft inland murmur of 
waters. In the clear pools of her little river, great men of the Restoration have 
been buried in Christian baptism ; in the folded hills lie the ashes of her dead. 
The holiest affections of the human heart have sung themselves into the very 
walls of each rising structure. All these things lend an indefinable charm and 
will ever give to old Bethany the sanctity of a shrine. 




Page Eleven 



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Pa^e Twelve 



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COCHRAN HALL 




LIBRARY BUILDING 



Page Thirteen 



1911 = C®lkg© Cafl(Bini(dlar =1912 

FALL TERM lOU. 

Sept. 19. — Fall Term begins, Matriculation Day .... Tuesday 
Nov. 8. — Anniver.sary of the American Literary Institute 

Tuesday 

Nov. 22. — Anniversary of the Neotrophian Literary 

Society Tuesday 

Dec. 20-22 — Examinations Wednesday Friday 

Dec. 22. — Christmas Recess begins Friday 

WINTER TERAL 1912- 

Jan. 9. — Winter Term begins Tuesday 

Feb. 22. — Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies, Wednesday 
Mar. 7. — Anniversary of the Adelphian Literary Society 

Thursday 

Mar. 28-30 — E.xaminations Thursday, Saturday 

Mar. 30. — Winter Term Ends Saturday 

SPRING TERM, 1912. 

April 3. — Spring Term begins Tuesday 

June (i-10. — Examinations Friday, Saturday 

June 9. — Baccalaureate Sermon, 11 A. M Sunday 

June 9. — Annual Address, 8 P. M Sunday 

June 10. — Final Chapel Services, 3 P. M Monday 

June 10.— Wilfey Oratorical Contest, 8 P. AI Monday 

June 11.— Field Day, 10 A. M Tuesday 

June 11-12 — Annual Meeting Board of Trustees 

Tuesday, Wednesday 

June 11. — President's Reception, 7 P. M Tuesday 

June 12. — Class Day Wednesday 

June 12. — Concert of Music Department, 8 P. ^^I. . .Wednesday 

June 13. — Annual Commencement .- Thursday 

June 13. — Exhibition of Adelphian Literary Soicety, 8 

P. M '. Thursday 



Page Foarteen 



Bosiirdl ©fF TiTMSitd 



Term Expires, June, 1912 

Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, LL. D New Castle. Pa. 

Hon. George H. Anderson Pittsburg, Pa. 

W. H. Gardner Pittsburg, Pa. 

F. D. Power, LL. D Washington, D. C. 

Francis C. McMillin Cleveland, Ohio 

Oliver C. \'odrey East Liverpool, Ohio 

W. R. Errett Pittsburg, Pa. 

E. T. Norton Connellsville, Pa. 

Earl W. Oglebay, LL. D Cleveland, O. 

Russell Errett Cincinnati, O. 

Term Expires, June, 1913 

Judge John H. Campbell New Cumberland, W. Va. 

J. E. Curtis Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Hon. 1\L M. Cochran, LL. D Uniontown, Pa. 

Frank H. :\Iain New York, N. \. 

Charles H. Irvin Big Run, Pa. 

W. A. Dinker Pittsburg, Pa. 

Senator George T. Oliver Pittsburg, Pa. 

Judge L. T. Farr Lisbon, O. 

David P. Larimore West Newton, Pa. 

O. M. Sala Minerva, O. 

Term Expires, June, 1914 

J. W. Alulholland Philadelphia. Pa. 

Hon. \\'illiam H. Graham Pittsburg, Pa. 

Hon. Oliver S. Marshall New Cumberland, W. Va. 

Campbell Jobes Bethanv, W. Va. 

A. L. White Wheeling, W. \^a. 

John S. Naylor Wheeling, W. Va. 

Samuel George Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Hon. W. M. Hays Washington. D. C. 

Associate Justice Joseph R. Lamar Washington. D. C. 

A. E. McBee New York, N. Y. 

W. C. Pendleton Warren, O. 

EXECUTR'E COMMITTEE. 
Hon. M. M. Cochran, Chairman. Hon. George H. Anderson 

Hon. Wm. H. Graham Thomas W. Phillips 

W. A. Dinker W. R. Errett 

T. E. Cramblet David P. Larimore 

W. H. Gardner. 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

T. E. Cramblet, Presdent and Treasurer 

A. C. Pendleton, Secretary. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 
W. R. Errett W. H. Gardner, W. A. Dinker 



Page Fifteen 




FRONT VIEW OF CHAPEL 




Page Sixteen 



REAR VIEW OF THE CHAPEL 




PRESIDENT T. E. CRAMBLET 



Page Seventeen 




AVILLIAM BROOKS TAYLOR, A. M. 

Dean of tlie College of the Bible. 





MRS. AXXA R. BOURXE, A. B. 

Professor of English. 



PLILLIP JOHXSOX, A. M., B. D. 
Professor Psycliology and Philosophy 

Page Eighteen 




PEARL MEHAFFEY, A. 15. 

Professor of German and French 




ALBERT C. AVORKAUX, A. M. 

Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 




W. PAUL WEBER, A. M., PIi. D. 
Professor of Mathematics. 



Page Nineteen 




R. H. AVYXXE, A. M. 

Professor Emeritus of Hebrew aiitl 
Christian Doctrine. 





A. C. PEXnLETOX, A. M. 

I'lofessor Emeritus, (iermau and Erencli. 



AUSTIX PERRY FINLEY, A. M., B. D. 

Piofessor of Hebrew and Cliurcli History 



Page Twenty 




LULA McCAUSLAXD, 15. O. 

Professor of Elocution ami Oratory. 




FRANK R. GAY, A. M. 

Professor of Greek. 









1 



WILLIAM HILL, A. M. 

Dean of Agriculture and Land Dii'ector. 



Page Twenty-One 




E. Lee PERRY, A. B. 

Professor of Latin. 





JANE HEATH DICKSOX, A. B. 
Professor of Art. 



HRR>rAX DEUTSCH, B. S. M. S. 
Professor of Biology. 



Page Twenty-Two 




AIXSLEE MOORE, A. B. 

Professor of Voice Culture. 




JEAN CORRODI MOOS, A. M. 
Director of Department of Music. 



J^ 




W. H. HEIN, B. S. 

Professor of Botany and Horticulture. 



Page Twenty-Three 




ELIZAISETH AKMSTKOXG, B. S. 
Professor of Domestic Science. 





MKS. ZILPAH WHEAT 
Instructor in Business Department. 



FAX ME MARIE ATCHESOX. M. S. 
Director of .Model School. 



Pnye Tnenty-Four 




MRS. JEAX CORRODI MOOS 
Assistant Directoi' of Music. 



******** 



To Our Faculty 

"Thou, too, toil on, Professors, late ! 
Toil on, Professors, strong and great ! 
The little "prep" with all his tears. 
Before thy presence awed appears, 
And trembling listens for his fate ! 
The seniors know thy laws of steel. 
Which laws have suffered not repeal, 
They know 'twas hard with these to cope, 
What conflicts waged, yet e'er defeat. 
Strive not, O Freshies, these laws to mock, 
They are established like a rock; 
O Sophs, these iron-clad rules well hail, 
Or ellse thy pleasures they'll curtail ! 
In spite of Juniors loudest roar. 
In spite the fact they loudly swore, 
Toil on O Profs., such laws decree. 
Our flunks, our grades are all with thee, 
Our flunks, our grades, our joys, our tears. 
The "Sheep-skins" for our future years 
Are all with thee, are all with thee." 

— From The Miiscolojuan, '11. 



Page Twenty-FiTe 



The Coming Faculty 



\ 



\^M|k; 



F. R. Gay, Jr. 




W. B. Taylor, Jr. 




Ewing Workman 

Page Twenty-Six 




Ruth Moos 



The Coming Faculty 





Lucile Workman 



Erwin and Oliver Hein 




Charles Weber 




Mary Hancock Weber 

Page Twenty-Seven 



Bethany's Presidential Possibility 




HON. CHAMP CLARK 



Bethany has always been proud of her sons and daughters. 
Some of them are found in the most influential places in the 
land. She never forgets them. Just now there are none of her 
sons that we are any more proud of than the subject of this 
sketch. Some of the other schools have said that they were 
ahead of Bethany because we never turned out a president. Just 
now it looks very favorable for Bethany to turn the trick on them. 
Champ Clark is a man whom we all love and Bethany is very 
an.xious for his victory. In fact we are so interested in his cause 
that we have organized a Champ Clark club in Bethany. Xearly 
all the students have joined it. Democrats, republicans and all 
want to see Bethany's great son thus honored. 



Page Twenty-Eiyht 



SEHNSUCHT 

Oh! for a voice from that star-girt realm. 
An echo, a sound from its reaches of calm. 
To breathe on the tumult of life and say 
There is flushing somewhere a serener day, 
O'er the tempest and din, the unresting 

and sin, 
To fall on our hearts as our loved ones 

pass In, 
To whisper of life, of its taintless bliss, 
Above — oh! above the mad whirl dance 

of this! 
I listened long but the night gave back 
No token, no sound from its fire-paved 

track. 
Empaled in silence lay the goal 
And the yearning of ages swept in on my 

soul. 
But lo! a light from the cloud appears. 
Above the rush of throttling years 
A human hand is raised to bless 
And human lips part in tenderness, 
Down the death-way of years a foot fall 

nears, 
And a human face dashed with human 

tears. 
The dawn light ui)on it. majestic, calm- 
eyed. 
Looks forth in life's sorrow, the clouds 

divide. 
Oh! can it be that Maker of all 
Is treading beside us the gloom and the 

thrall? 
I believe it. The hand that fashioned the 

sea. 
Is the hand that struck calm into deep 

nalilee, 
Oh brother, 'twas C!od walked the dusk of 

our zone 
Here's a bethel of souls, come, plant you 

a stone. 

A. R. B. 



Page Twenty-Nine 



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Loved and Lost Awhile 

ft3* e^ e^ 

RUSSEL ERRET, JR. 
Died August 1 8, 1 9 1 1 . 

MRS. MARY ANN HOLLIS 
Died November 27, 191 1. 

MALCOLM McNElL ERRETT 
Died February 18, 1912. 






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Page Thirty 



\ 



Parting Lines 

By Wylda Bell Millison. 

We must leave, though we fain would stay longer, 

Longer stay in the college we love. 
We sit in the shade of her trees and we ponder. 

Shall we ever return and our loyalty prove? 
For to service we hear the world call us, 

Oh the world does not will that we longer here stay. 
But the thoughts that forever we have so appall us, 

That in sorrow and sadness now turn we away. 
So full of cheer, 
Bethany dear! 
Up 'mongst the green hills, Bethany stands. 

And though we have grieved her, 

We pray as we leave her. 
That we may deserve this iWater so grand. 

The parting draws nearer, the hours do not linger. 

And now the last sweet days have come. 
When Bethany fair though we long yet to linger. 

We must turn and must go each our way alone. 
Foe Bethany cannot keep us forever. 

Nor do we desire that we longer might stay, 
But Oh it is hard those true friendships to sever! 

It is hard from our carefree life to break 'way. 
So full of cheer, 
Bethany dear! 
Up 'mongst the green hills Bethany stands. 

And though we have grieved her. 

We pray as we leave her. 
That we- may deserve this Mater so grand. 

For she will keep growing, while we will go striving 

In the big world full of hard knocks and care. 
But we know that her heart will be glad if we're thriving 

And we know, though removed far, her love will still share, 
And if we succeed in the work we have planned for, 

Her true praise will thrill us far more than the rest. 
For we'll feel that we've held to the ideals she stands for, 
And in her glad smile we'll be honored and blest. 
So full of cheer, 
Bethany dear! 
Up 'mongst the green hills Bethany stands. 
And O may no base thought. 
In our coming life blot 
The pure inspiration we've had from her hands! 



Page Thirty-Ont; 




JAMKS R. WILKIN, A. B. 
(Classical), A. M. 

New Cumberland, W. Va. 

KAPPA ALPHA. 

Commencement Orator. 
President Senior Class. 
President N. L. S. '12. 
Recliabite. 

"Time and I against any two." 



P'ERDIXAXD A. POFFEXBERGKR, A. U. 

(Classical) 

Lydia, >lai-yl;ind. 

BETA THETA PI. 

Salutatorian. 
President N. L. S., '12. 
.i^ssist^nt Editor Collegian, '12. 
L.terary Editor Collegian. '11. 
Secretary Y. M. C. A., '11. 
Treasurer Y. M. B. C,. '12. 

".A great mind becomes a great fortune." 





WILLIAM SAYLOR A^^LKIX, A. B. 
(Classical) A. M. 

Xew Cumberland, W. Va. 

KAPPA ALPHA. 

Valedictorian. 
President N. L. S., '12. 
Manager Football Team, '11. 
Field Day Committee, '10. 
Athletic Editor Collegian, '11. 
Basket Ball Team, 'lO-'ll, '11-'12. 
Chairman Field Day Committee, '11. 
Treasurer Y. M. C. A., '11. 

"To be efficient in a quiet way 
That is my aim thi-oughout each day." 



Page Thirty-Two 



MILDRED STEWART, Ph. B. 

Killbuck, Ohio. 

ALPHA XI DELTA. 

Commencement Orator. 
President A. L. I., '12. 
President Y. W. C. A., '11-12. 
Confession in "Everyman". 

'Gentleness and love and trust prevail." 





EDGAR ALLAN JOHNSTOX, A. B. 
(Ministerial), A. M. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Commencement Orator. 

A. L. S. 

Rechabite. 

'I take all knowledge to be my province." 



MARY GWENDOLYN LEWIS, Ph. B. 
Bethany, W. ^'a. 

ALPHA XI DELTA. 

O. L. S. 

Secretary Senior Class. 

Historian Sophomore Class, '09-'10. 

Class Prophet. 

"If e'er she knew an evil thought. 
She spoke no evil word of anyone." 




Page Thirty-Three 




GEORGE C. NEIL, A. B., (Ministerial). 

AA'est Unity, O. 

Vice President Senior Class. 
President A. L. S., '09. 
President Y. M. B. C, '09-'10. 
Member Atliletic Association, '09-'10. 
Manager Foot Ball Team, '09. 
Treasurer Board of Athletic Control, 

'11-'12. 
College Secretary and Bursar, 'lO-'ll. 
Class History. 

"In work I move, live and have my being." 



HAZEL MERLE MERCER, A. B 

(Cas.sical) 

Rudolph, Ohio. 

ALPHA XI DELTA. 

Commencement Orator. 
President O. L. S., '11-'12. 
Secretary Junior Class, '10-' 11. 

"With seiitle, yet prevailing force 
Intent upon lier destined course. 
Graceful and useful, all she does." 





ROY SLIFER, A. B. ((lassical) 
Boonsboro, Md. 

BETA THETA PI. 

Vice President .lunior Class, 'lO-'ll. 
Treasurer Y. M. C. A., '0S-'09. 
President Y. M. B. C, '0S-'09. 
Manager College Bookstore. 

"Cordial and courteous — a gentleman in 
and out." 



Page Thirty-Four 



HARRV L. ICE, A. B. (Ministerial) A. M. 
Slirevepoi't, La. 

Commencement Orator. 
A. L. S. 

Football Team, 'OT-'OS. 
Winner Fresh-Soph Debate, '10. 
Second Place Wilfley Oratorical Con- 
test, '11. 
Intercollegiate Debate, '11-'12. 
Business Manager Bethanian, '12. 

"Ambition is the spur which makes men 
struggle with destiny." 





MAREL EBERLV, Ph. 

West Unity, O. 

Commencement Orator. 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

O. L. S. 

Tri-State College, B. O., 'O'i 



Girl's Physical 

'10-'12. 
German Club. 



Director, Bethany, 



'Chann strikes tlie sight, but merit wins 
the soul." 



GEORGE CARL HETTLER, Ph. B. 
Altoona, Pa. 



KAPPA ALPHA. 

Editor-in-Chief Bethanian, 
President A. L. I., '11-'12. 
President Sophomore Class 
Assistant Editor-in-Chief 

•lO-'ll. 
Assistant Manager Baseball 

'09. 



12. 

'09-'10. 
Bethanian, 

Team, 



"Not what we think or say; but what we 
do will have its effect on tlie world." 




Page^Thirty-Five 




AATLDA MILLISON, B. L., B. Ped. 

Xew Castle, Pa. 

A. L. I. 

Senior Farewell Poem. 
Graduate of Expression. 
Ass't Instructor in Mathematics. 
"Riches" in Morality Play "Every- 
man." 

"The flower of meekness on a stem of 
srace." 



ENOCH CHARLES SJHTH, A. B. 

( Slinisterial ) . 

Crawfordsville, Ind. 

BETA THETA PI. 

Commencement Orator. 

President A. L. I., '12. 

Tri-State Orator, '11-'12. 

Wilfley Contest, '12. 

Minister at Sistersville, W. Va., '11- 

'12. 
Literary Editor Collegian. 
Humorous Editor of Bethanian. 

'Retiring, resened and retricent — such is 
our heio." 





ELIZABETH M. BITE, Mus. B. 
Aui'ora, Xeb. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA. 

A. L. I. 

Art Editor Bethanian. 

"Mu.sic so softens and disarms the mind. 
That not an arrow does resistance tind." 



Page Tfiirty-Six 



GEORGE J. OWEN, A. B. (Minlsteiial). 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

KAPPA ALPHA. 

Commencement Orator. 

President A. L. S., '09-'10. 

President Junior Class, 'lO-'ll. 

Wilfley Oratorical Contest, 'lO-'ll. 

Intercollegiate Debating Team, '11- 
'12. 

Preliminary Tri-State Oratorical Con- 
testant, '12. 

Editor-in-Chief Collegian, •11-'12. 

Title-role in "Everyman", '12. 

Winner Fresh-Soph Debate, '10. 

"A great mind will neither give an affront 
nor bear it." 





ELIZABETH MARGARET COX, Mus. B. 
Cameron, W. \'a. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA. 

Treasurer Y. W. C. A., '11-'12. 

"O music sphei'e decended maid. 
Friend of pleasure, wisdom's aid." 



JOHN PETER RODGER, A. B. 

(Classical). 

HooversviUe, Pa. 

President A. L. S., '11. 
Treasurer Senior Class. 

'I seek no better want than my own con- 
science." 




Page Thirty-Seven 




DAISY LEE RAMSEY, Mus. B. 
West Union, W. Va. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA. 

A. L. I. 

President Young Ladies' Bible Class. 

Alumni Editor Collegian, '11-'12. 

"If women only knew the e.vtent of their 
power." 



\VALTER ALEXIS COPE, Ph. B. 

East Liverpool, Ohio. 

SIGMA NU. 

President A. L. I., '12. 
Class Orator. 

Member Football Team, '11. 
Member Debating Team, '12. 

love the lineage of heroes, but I love 
merit more." 





JOSEPHINE BARXS, Mus. 
Bamesville, Ohio. 



B. 



O. L. 
Y. W. 



A. 



"She was a phantom of delight." 



Pa^e Thirty-Eight 



Ethel m. charnoch, b. L. 

Wellsbiiig, W. Va. 

ZETA TAU ALPHA. 

A. L. I. 
B. Ped. 

Treasurer of Y. W. C. A., 'OO-'IO; 
'lO-'ll. 

"Gather roses while they blossom; to- 

inorrow is not today! 
Allow no moment to escape; tomoi-row is 

not today." 




MARY ADELINE ALEXANDER, Ph. B., 
R. Ped. 

AYheeling, W. Va. 

ALPHA DELTA PSL 

President O. L. S. 
German Club. 

"A little learning is a dangerous thing, 
Drink deep, oi' taste not the Piei'ian 
spring." 



^^m^ 



Senior Class 

CLASS OFFICERS 

James R. Wilkin President 

George C. Neil Vice-President 

Mary G. Lewis Secretary-Treasurer 

E. C. Smith Historian 

Colors : — Lavender and White. 

Motto: — "Vita Est Opportunitas et Alea Animi." 

YELL 

"Kiopi kiopi, hi ho hum, 

Boomalacka boomalacka bum bum bum : 

Ip city i-ki, rah rah reive, 

Seniors Seniors, 1913." 



Page Thirty-Nine 



Normal Graduates 

^w ^w ^* 

DALE ROSS, B. Ped. 
Elizabeth, W. \'a. 
"Leant not only by a coiiirt's rush, 
but by a rose's blush." 

ELSIE WILSON, B. Ped. 
Wheeling, W. \'a. 
"This z^'orld is no blot nor bhuik : it means intetisclx 
and means s^ood." 

MARY A. ALEXANDER, B. Ped. 
^^•heeling•, W. Va. 
"She that brings sunshine into the lives of others, 
eannot keep it from herself." 

SARA GORDON, B. Ped. 

Bethany, W. \'a. 

'There's life alone in duty done, and rest alone in striz'i)ig. 

MINNIE SMITH, B. Ped. 
Bethany, W. \"a. 
"She hath a gentle, timid air." 

MYRTLE J. SCHOLES, B. Ped. 
Bellaire, Ohio, 
"HappY am I: from all Tin free! 
Why aren't they all contented like me." 

LELA MOORE, B. Ped. 

Moundsville, W. \'a. 

"She ean be sieeet to those she loz'es." 

MARGARET E. HURT, B. Ped. 
Pounding Mill, A^a. 
''Just being happy is a fine tiling to do. 
Looking on the bright side rather than the blue" 

ETHEL I. McAIillen, B. Ped. 
Bridgeville, Pa. 
"A chcerfull mien, a happy smile, is what 
announces her." 



PaiJe Forty 



Senior History 

^W f^> ^* 



In the latter part of the year 1008, old Bethany in her grandeur and her 
majestic stateliness presented to an earnest band of knowledge seekers, a s]3ectacle 
at once both beautiful and inspiring. She held to the view of this searching band 
vistas draped with cosmic beauty, landscapes, teeming with a myriad life, and 
real treasures stores for the gratification of vision and heart. 

To Bethany this group of young lives presented a great mystery, for it is 
well known that man, alone, is the hidden secret which baffles every intellect, 
however powerful and acute. Even the Ionic philosophers were right wlien they 
said, "Mystery, thy name is man." 

Having converged from various States at this Mecca of Christian people, 
these diamonds in the rough, possessing many faculties and powers — imagina- 
tion, motion, conscience, courage, patience, faith, hope, and love : gave themselves 
over into the hands of the expert workmen to be cut and polished. 

What a task it seemed to the seers of Bethany to develop the mind and 
body and to mould the character of these straggling youths. Yet, out of the 
number who came in 19(18 are found those who will give justice from behind the 
bar, those who will grace the teaching profession, those who will make wives and 
husbands, (At least one who has already made one. ). and those who will proclaim 
the salvation of lost souls. 

As freshmen we held our own on the athletic field and in literary effort. 
As Sophomores we gained the proverbial wisdom which is always given to that 
class in college circles. 

As Juniors we were noted by our banquets, oratorical powers, and schol- 
astic honors. As Seniors we believed that any member of the class is able to 
stand on his or her own merits and carry off the honors of the da)'. 

Our last year at this, our .\lma Mater, has been one of unbroken success. 
The relations to the members of the faculty who have guided our feeble efforts 
towards obtaining a higher education and more fully preparing ourselves to meet 
the great battles of life which face us in the world have been pleasant and 
profitable. To them we owe many thanks. 

It is not our purpose to say farewell to our frends and fellow students, 
or to the faculty, although we may be separated forever in this world, as we all 
believe in optimism and think that we may live better in the hearts of our friends 
after we leave than when we are present in body. Therefore, we commend to 
the watch and care of the Junior class of 1912, the keeping of the honored customs 
of Bethany College, the training of the feeble Freshmen who stand where we 
once stood, and the preservation of the high standards of scholasticism, oratory, 
and gentlemanliness. 

ENOCH CHARLES SMITH. 



Page Forty-One 



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Page Forty-Two 



Junior Officers 



President C. H. Hulme 

Vice-President Edna McAIasters 

Secretary Mary Perry 

Historian Robert Hueston 

Treasurer J. Albert Hall 

Colors : — Purple and Gold. 
Motto : — "Labore Vicimus." 

5^W t^f^ Jr' 

Junior Class History 

The Junior Class of 1912 has a record of which they are 
proud. As Freshmen they proved to the Sophomores that they 
were not to be trifled with, neither with brains or brawn. In 
the annual class fight, carried on in the time honored way, they 
came off victorious over the Sophomores. Then in a joint de- 
bate with the Sophomores, they came so near winning, that they 
have never been challenged in any other contest requiring 
knowledge and oratorical skill. 

As Sophomores they cast a spell over the Freshmen that it 
required the assistance of their "Guardian Angel" and the speci- 
fied rules of. the President to get them to raise their colors. And 
when the day set for the contest arrived, though they had the 
assistance of the Seniors and the Prep, department combined, 
they would not raise their flag because Nature aided the Sopho- 
mores with a cold wave. By the rules formerly agreed upon, 
the Sophomores claimed the victory. 

The present Junior class, though it has lost and added some 
good members, still has a number of its charter members. In our 
ranks we have preachers, teachers, lawyers, doctors, and musi- 
cians. We have carried ourselves so nobly that even now a num- 
ber of students cannot distinguish between Seniors and Juniors. 
The outlook for the class is bright and we hope to add a num- 
ber of honored members to Bethany's already illustrious alumni 
association. R. H. 



Page Forty-Tfiree 




C. H. HUIiME; 

When the "Freshies" of 1910 arrived 
on the Campus there was among them, a 
big bushy headed fellow from the hills of 
Pennsylvania. Attired in a light suit, tan 
shoes, blue socks and red necktie, he 
sought admittance to the Ministerial De- 
partment. No one paid much attention to 
this husky fellow at first. 

However, by his amiable disposition and 
flattery he soon won his way to hearts of 
several fair damsels, but one day it came 
out he was married and then it was all off. 

"Dad" also made his record in the 
class room. It goes without saying he is 
the best student in College. He tells you 
this himself. Not only does he play an 
important role in College affairs, but his 
fame is beginning to spread over the 
country as a preacher. Some day Bethany 
will feel proud of "Dad", for when he gets 
out into the world. Henry Ward Beecher 
will be in the shade. 



Dear Editor: — 

I hail from the Smoky City. My pur- 
pose in coming to Bethany was for "bizzi- 
ness" alone. This is why I live down town 
instead of Phillips Hall. I consider my- 
self a star in my classes, especially in 
Chemistry. Prof. Workman thinks so 
too. I am also gifted as a speaker, equal 
to any occasion that demands my talent. 
You may also be glad to know that I am a 
suffragette, I believe in woman's rights 
and my ambition is after I have finished 
college to lead the women to victory. You 
may expect to see me an important figure 
in the cause of Women's Suffrage in the 
future. 

Lovingly, 
EDNA McMASTER. 





ROBERT HXTESTOX. 

"Hobhie" is a model student — scholar, 
chorister, historian, athlete, class scrapper 
and veteran Bizzite. He is a faithful cham- 
pion of the Faculty and does not believe 
in the students' dictating to that august 
body. The Junior class considers itself 
most fortunate in being associated with 
genial, generous-hearted, "thunny Bob." 



rage Forty-Fonr 



JOHN CLIXTOX PRYOR. 

Above all things Clint is a scholar. In 
his classes he has been eminently success- 
ful — has made them in record time and 
walked all the way. Judging by his ser- 
ious dignified manner one would never 
dream of the wealth of natural wit and 
humor stored up in that red head of his. 
Purthernioi-e, he is remarkable in that he 
is a prophet not "without honor in his 
own country" being the "Bishop of the 
Diocese" in which he was born. 





VELMA RODEFER. 

From Shadyside, just across the river 
in Ohio, she came in the fall of 1910 with 
"Onward" — as her motto. "They", she 
and her motto, have proven themselves 
true students of all subjects and not only 
the Junior Class but also Bethany College 
are justly proud of them. She is merry 
on occasions, pleasant always but modest 
to the extreme, for instance; "Only 99 per 
cent in Greek; 9 7 per cent in Cal." Busy 
always and bizzy generally, briefly; 
Petite and neat. 

Pair and sweet, 
She charms all 
Who with her meet. 



EARXEST HXTXTER WRAY. 

This is Earnest Hunter Wray of Vir- 
ginia and none has ever been found who 
has had the temerity to shorten the name. 
Dignity is his stock-in-trade and many is 
the time when a Freshman has mistaken 
him tor the President or at least a Trus- 
tee. The class has few members that are 
so talented. He can sing, play, paint, act, 
(see picture as skeleton in "Everyman") 
and is truly an all around valuable man. 
The saddest part of it all is that he is a 
confirmed woman hater and while we are 
sure that he will shine as a bright star 
from the pulpit and platform, we fear it 
will be alone. So far the only one he has 
taken into his heart and affection is a bull 
terrier. On the whole we are very proud 
of this tall Virginian. 




Page Forty-FiTe 




HELJL1S L. JnLLER 

Helmas hit Bethany in the fall of 1908 
and has been striking ever since until now 
he is struck with "Mae." Bizzite???? If 
anyone would like to be "coached" in biz, 
Helmas is the boy who can do it. He will 
show you how to get the inside track with- 
out seeming to want it, and how to en- 
tertain a young lady in the kitchen, mak- 
ing candy, while her intended is waiting 
for her in the parlor. A student? Yes, 
one of the best, not so talkative as some 
of the rest but when it comes to examina- 
tions, this New Yorker is ready. The 
Junior Class expects great things of their 
brother. 



MARY PERRY. 

This classmate of ours is to be praised 
for her class spirit and her earnest efforts 
to help her Junior companions. She is al- 
ways to be depended upon, both in class 
and in other college activities. Always 
cheerful, gentle and kind, she has indeed 
gianed the admiration and esteem of all 
who know her. She is one of our Beth- 
any girls and this of course is quite con- 
venient for "Bob." who must prepare some 
lessons with her, and without doubt, the 
warm friendship which exists between 
them is due to nothing more than the ar- 
dent preparation of these difficult lessons. 
With her pleasing personality and her 
earnest efforts, we can all say that she is 
deserving of much praise. 





E. E. HARMOX. 

Better known as "Stone Age." Last 
year he did great work as sub on the "pig- 
skin" eleven and tliis year played such 
a brilliant game that the coach could not 
keep him off the varsity squad. He used 
to tell of his great ability as a baseball 
player, and from the form in which he 
came out last year, we know that he has 
been in the game before. 

This year his nerve seemed to take a 
different turn and he has made an excel- 
lent record in "biz.," and is an ardent ad- 
mirer of Intellectual Avenue. 



Page Forty-Six 



O. A. RODEFER. 

Who is this fellow with the pronounced 
strawberry complexion? Why that's 
Pete!!! Pete Who? "Pete" Rodefer, 
sometimes known by the appelation of On- 
ward. A Bizzite?? Not exactly, but great 
(Scott) he will be If he keeps on. "Pete's 
of rather Onward 's career has been just 
one calamitous event after another. 
Nevertheless he has maintained a good 
name among his fellows. As one is known 
by the company he keeps, so Onward us- 
ually can be picked out by a constant com- 
panion. Even tho' he doesn't study but 
eighteen hours a day he generally has his 
lessons. In fact, Rodefer has a knack of 
getting what he goes after. 





ELVA MANN. 

We wish to introduce you to Miss Elva, 
a girl of whom we are proud because she 
is always ready and willing to take her 
part in all the activities of college life ex- 
cept "bizz". Although she has her 
"Mann" with her always, she is never 
seen with him, but is often heard to repeat 
his name "Lawsie". Elva, unlike some 
diligent students, is jolly and full of fun. 
With her good record here, we expect 
her to win fame in years to come for her 
Alma Mater and her class. 



JOHN KTNLEY TENER. 

Here, gentle reader is one of the many 
J. K. Teners who hail from Wheeling. 
Kenley is a beloved cousin of Gov. Tener 
of Pennsylvania, and is slightly inclined to 
politics himself. When angered he empts 
masses of liquified jaw-breakers, but in- 
stantly drops into a sphinx-like silence at 
the appearance of a co-ed. Sh-she lives in 
Wheeling, accounting for his frequent vis- 
its home, and his extreme "non-bizzite- 
ness" in this vicinity. Above all a good 
student, a good fellow, and a typical col- 
lege man, as he has a disgust for every- 
thing in the shape of a freshman. 




Forty-Seven 




ARCHIE LIXXVILLE. 

This is Archie Linnville, the best math- 
ematician in school. "Arch" even taught 
the professor of 1910 a few things about 
Calculus. He appears to be a very staid 
fellow, but really he has a very sweet 
smile for those who know him. Although 
he is one of the best students in school, 
he has flunked out entirely in the most 
popular course offered, i. e., "Biz." He 
believes it is better not to have loved at 
all, than to have loved and lost. 



J. ROXAIiD GLEXX. 

"Brother" .1. Ronald Glenn hails from 
the state of North Carolina. He is the 
busiest man since Adam. The following 
are a few of the things which occupy his 
tim«; printing, publishing, preaching, be- 
sides being a student. 

J. Ronald, being agent for innumerable 
concerns, can sell you anything from in- 
surance and Cross-Reference Bibles to lo- 
comotives. Besides his ability to inter- 
rogate his professors, "Bro." Glenn is 
noted for his oratorical powers and his 
hilarious laughter. 





J. ALBERT HALL 

J. A. Hall came to us fresh from Balti- 
more. We did not know J. A., we did 
know Baltimore — was noted for its oys- 
ters — , and besides lemons are served 
with oysters. Remember we said we did 
not know J. A. Now. do not think that we 
say J. A. is a lemon, far be it from us!! 
When the baseball season opened, we 
judged him as an "Oriole Twirler" by his 
efficiency in the "Preachers' League," but 
this also was a delusion. It was the third 
year of his sojourn amongst us, we 
learned the real state of affairs. It was 
none other than the state of marriage. 
Now we throw aside the undignified name 
of "Baltimore" and address him as the 
Rev, J, A. Hall. 



Page Forty-Eight 



AATLLTAM S. SHXTTTLEAVORTH. 

Two yars ago last fall, a crude, rough, 
rustic individual from the buckwheat dis- 
tricts of West Virginia, sauntered through 
the Bethany portals. This mysterious 
character was William Socrates Shuttle- 
worth, Little did we realize what a gen- 
ius had come into our midst. He is not 
a man of many words but one of action, 
as is demonstrated in every phase of Beth- 
any's athletics. His influence is also felt 
in literary and society circles, having dis- 
tinguished himself by writing the poem 
entitled, "Dewdrops," and by going on 
"biz" once when he wasn't compelled to. 





Dear Editor: — 

I don't live in Bethany, I had my origin 
in Wellsburg. You have noticed I am a 
man of few words, "the deepest water is 
always still,'' that's why I keep my mouth 
shut. I am not a regular student in my 
classes but occasionally pay them a visit. 
I have always wanted to go on "bizz," 
but haven't the nerve to ask a girl. This 
year is my best chance to be proposed to 
and I am living in hope. After I leave 
college I expect to win for myself a rep- 
utation by making some radical changes in 
the ministry. 

Sincerely, 

EARL BIDDLE. 



J. AV. anTCHELL. 

"The classiest, best dressed, and best 
looking young man in Bethany," one of 
the fair sex was heard to remark about 
the original of this picture. The reason 
is given in a word: "He's from Charleroi." 
Mr. Mitchell originally planned to con- 
tniue his education in W. & J., but upon 
hearing the field agent recite the glories 
of our institution on the old Buffalo, he 
straightway packed his pictures and pen- 
nants and came to Bethany. During his 
Sophomore year, he capitulated to a 
stately co-ed and now receives dailies, 
post-marked "Somerset, Pa." We wish 
for "Mitch" all possible success in the bizz 
and business world and are awaiting the 
time when we can proudly view the shin- 
gle of "J. W, Mitchell, M. D." 




Page Forty-Nine 




WIIJilAM MEREDITH NORMENT. 

Here is "Bill," another worthy son of 
the Old Dominion. Married, a preacher, 
yet an all around good fellow, who has the 
most cordial "Howdy" in the school. Bill 
nas, so far, almost extinguished himself 
in work in school, but when he hits old 
Satan's trail, and releases the potent and 
fiery oratory, characteristic of him, the 
fur will fly!!! 



EDWIX W. AVELLS. 

It is with pardonable pride that the 
Junior class has the name of this ponder- 
ous bulk of "brain and brawn" engraved 
upon its scroll. Ever since this figure left 
his paternal environment and strolled 
forth to Bethany he has been a tower of 
influence in college activities. As an ath- 
lete he is the paragon of physical perfec- 
tion, having starred in both football and 
basketball. "Pud" makes good in his 
studies too (Pa please take note). Edwin 
may be introduced to those who know 
him not by the savage, uncouth yells, 
"Y-i-i-p-ling skordles — Yooowdling 
Scknumps"! ! ! ! 





MOODY EDAYARDS. 

This is Moody Edwards, Bishop of West 
Virginia. Moody carries only six studies, 
preaches twice every Sunday, has charge 
of eighty-seven churches in the state, and 
attends every convention held in the state. 
His favorite sport is fighting the "Anti-s" 
This is only the third year Moody has been 
a .Junior, but this is not Moody's fault: 
the curriculum grows larger every year. 
But we hope to take him out with us next 
year. Moody has attempted "Bizz" many 
times but is still free. Although he is 
always with a "Moody" fellow, yet he is 
one of the wittiest and jolliest fellows in 
school. 



Paije Fifty 



Who's Who of the Sophomores 

^* ^* ^* 

Freshmen, take these illustrious people for your models ! C. E. Rostofer, 
our most worthy President, is chief office holder around these parts. Besides 
being our president, he has the distinction of being toastmaster of the Rechabites, 
Lord High Chancelled of the Bizites, and Poet Laureate of Bethany. 

If the present aspirations of our Vice-President, Allen P. Milliken, which 
have for some time been directed toward the Buckeye State, are not soon real- 
ized, will they end with a ( K)nell? 

"Blanche" and "Libbets" are the "David and Jonathan" of our class. We 
see them together in the classroom, society hall, on the campus, on the corridor, at 
lectures, on the streets of the village and in the ice cream parlor. May we always 
see them together. 

G. L. Ferguson, quack doctor, renowned orator, and sweet singer, is an 
exception to most of the boys of the class in that he has no eyes for the fair maids 
of Bethany. Wonder why? 

Myrle Cunningham manifests dignity and knowledge worthy of a Senior, 
but she doesn't like to be told that she's smart. 

T. C. Horn, whose favorite name for himself is "ten-cent-horn" tooted in 
from the rural districts and avowed his intention of learning to blow his horn 
from the pulpit. 

Clifton ^L Teisher— Biz ! ! ! ! 

Elsie Geraldine Oleo Margarine possesses the longest name in the class. 
Her length of name is equalled only by her breadth of fame. Her intellect is no 
less bright than her eyes. 

"Loving Joe" lives up to his name. For it has been said "I never saw a 
fellow like Brooks. He can make love to six girls at the same time, and not 
have any of them mad at him." In the case of Dale Ross, history has repeated 
itself. For has not the Hessian force lost out? 

That like dislikes like has been disproved. John O. McNeeley, retiring, 
unassuming, shows evidence of a liking for a modest and shy little girl in Phillips 
Hall. 

C. C. Wilkinson — ministerial student, volunteer missionary and benedict. 

H. H. Kidd, has broken the record and gone beyond the limit. We chal- 
lenge any other class in school to show a student who can beat Kidd's average of 
99 8-9 per cent. 

Fate tried to conceal them by naming them Smith, but to no avail. Popu- 
larly known as Big Smth and Little Smith, both have become famous, the one in 
Athletics, the other in biz. 

Romaine is not a sleigh bell, nor a church bell ; neither is she a dinner bell, 
but since she is the only Bell of the school, whv not call her a school bell? 

R. Donald Beck, of New York City, — tra la ! He is a baseballologist 
and basketball star of the class. He shines not only in athletics but also in the 
classroom. 

Another musician is Bessie Spence. who plays so well that she makes 
Sparkes fly. 

D. P. Morris, our \'ocalist, prefers the German melodies but he likes 
Phillips Hall bread and syrup. 

The friend of everybody, one of the most popular boys in school, a good 
student, and an all-around fellow, is "Bobbie" Wilkin. 

Page Fifty-One 



Sophomore Class 



t^~ 6^* ^^' 



Colors : — Orange and Black. 
!Motto: — "Remigans non T'luitans." 



YELL 

"Whoop 'em up, whoop 'em up, whoop 'em up 
We are in the Sophomore crowd. 
Who are we, who are we, 
SOPHOMORES." 



loud, 



OFFICERS 

President C. E. Rostofer 

Vice-President Allen Milliken 

Secretary-Treasurer Elizabeth Wilkin 

Historian Edith Hunter 

Captain of Campus John Smith 

ROLL 

Robert \\'ilkin Donald Beck Dale Ross 

T. C. Horn Charles Wilkinson Edith Hunter 

J. O. McNeely Clifton Teisher Romaine Bell 

Elizabeth Wilkin Howard Blanning Perry Morris 

Floyd Smith Bessie Spence Elsie \\'ilson 

C. E. Rostofer ]\Iyrl€ Cunningham Lynn Ferguson 

John Smith Hulbert H. Kidd Allen Milliken 



page Fifty-Two 




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Hi^ory of the Freshman Class 

^^ e^* ^^ 

September 1911 found the class of 1915 ready to begin its college career 
in the time honored halls of Bethany, never before in the history of the college 
had its halls been graced with students endowed with such high intelligence and 
decorum. Since the day of matriculation the dignified Seniors have looked upon 
us with admiration, and the trembling Sophomores soon perceived that the class 
of 191."j was not the easy mark that the Freshman classes of other years have been. 

The first distinguishing feature of this class was that not one of them 
passed through the fiery trials of "hazing." This was due to the fact that the 
Sophomores were so terror stricken that they dared not molest one of our num- 
ber. At an early date a meeting was called to which fiftv loyal Freshmen re- 
sponded. The officers were chosen and installed, and an auspicious class was or- 
ganized. Air. Lawrence Doak, our esteemed President, has inspired the class 
with lofty ideals and noble ambitions. It was in the class room where the 
"Sophs" first sat up and took notice. There as elsewhere, the Freshmen have 
won laurels of success. Not only has the class figured so prominently in the class 
rooms, but on the athletic field as well. At least half of our best athletes hailed 
from the freshman class. In the basketball game between Geneva and Bethany, 
victory would not have been ours had it not been for the dexterious plays of Dink 
Miller, and his efficient Freshmen associates. Not only in basket ball, but in foot 
ball as well, has success been partly, if not wholly, due to the valued assistance 
rendered by the faithful and skilled freshies. 

In biz, as in everything else, have the freshmen been very conspicuous, 
having taken the lead as soon as they arrived on the scene of action. All 
records were broken by the freshmen going on biz the first term, and, in fact the 
first month while the poor Sophs, dared not even remonstrate against this first 
violation of the time-honored custom of the valley of the Buffalo. From time 
immemorial the fair sex has looked up to those who possess great intellectual 
powers. In this, Bethany has been no exception, for the freshies soon won and 
held the hearts of the fairest of the fair, while the forlorn Sophs, could only 
behold them with envious eyes. 

The Sophs, breathed a sigh of relief when they learned that the annual 
class fight was to be dispensed with, for they realized that a disastrous defeat 
would be theirs. However, their state of undue anxiety was wholly unnecessary, 
for the class of 191.5 has risen above the barbarious custom of brutal class fights, 
and stands for the highest ideals of manhood, and womanhood, of worth and 
efficiency, and for the truest type of Christian character. 

So much for the history of the Freshman Class For its future we pre- 
dict glory and honor. Watch us ! 

LYDA HUMPHREY. 



Page Fihy-Five 



Helen Abbiss 
Lois Abbiss 
Don Allen 
Herbert Allen 
Harriet Alexander 
Helen Atwood 
C. M. Bacon 
Guy Barger 
O. T. Baumgarner 
S. F. Bittner 
Lyman Blood 
Percy Britton 
Thomas Brown 
John ESurgan 
William Butler 
Mary Caldwell 
Allegre Carbo 
John A. Clark 
John Cooper 
Jesse Coughenour 
Wiley Daubenspeck 
W. O. Depp 
Lawrence Doak 
Cecil Dodd 
Hubert Draine 
Floyd Duffee 
John Edwards 
N. W. Evans 
Harold Elson 
Kiziah Fair 
Ellis Fair 
Excell Fair 
G. N. Fuller 



Freshman Class 

(^' t^^ %^^ 

Color:— Old Rose and Slate. 

Flower : — Red Carnation. 

Motto : — Vivamus, dum vivimus. 

YELL 

]\Iush and milk and sunflower seed ! 
That's the stuff on which we feed. 
We're the hot stuff of creation 
We're the Freshmen aggregation. 

OFFICERS 

President Lawrence Doak 

\'ice President Robert Sparks 

Secretary Leland ]\lurphy 

Treasurer John A. Clark 

Captain of Campus Rees Lloyd 

Class Historian Lyda Humphrey 

ROLL 

Walter Funk Lester Noble 

Mollie Gerke Elizabeth Owens 

Edwin Gordon Maynard Patton 

Mrs. Hall Eugene Philips 

Beulah Hamilton Hazel Philips 

David Harris Dorothy Perran 

Toseph Henry C. W. Pultz 

Elbert Hensley Rudolph Renner 

Frank Hesse Errett Rodgers 

Dessie Hill M. Glen Robertson 

William Holland Ralph Ryan 

William Hollis Harry Schulthesis 

Lyda Humphrey Charles Sauft'er 

William Hutchison Alva Scott 

Mildred Houston Pamela Scott 

Blanche Hoge Henry A. Seel 

W. N. Jackson C P. Shropshire 

Walter Lape John R. Sloan 

D. R. LaRue Harold Smith 

Wilfred Larimer Helen Smith 

Rees Lloyd R. E. Smith 

Alario Lambard Charles Sonda 

T. N. Mahan Robert Sparks 

Spurgeon Mahon Graham Taylor 

Arabella Marvin Joy Taylor 

A. McGinley Percy Thomas 

Walter McGowan Clarence L^nderwood 

J. P. McMullin Clyde Watson 

Rafael Menendez Charles Welch 

Bertha Messick Lucy Wilson 

Albert Miller W. F. Wilson 

Howard Moren Maude Wollem 
Leland Murphy 



Patie Fifty-Six 




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Page Fifty-SeTen 



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Paiie Fifty-Eifht 




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YOUNG' LADIES' HALL 









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BIRDSEYE VIEW OF COLLEGE HILL 



Page Fifty-Nine 




CAMPUS SCENE 




ENTRANCE TO CAMPUS 



Page Sixty 



Literary Societies 

Prof. Philip Johnson. "^ 

From the very first year of the college, on throughout the 
full extent of its history the training offered by the literary 
societies has been considered one of the conspicuous features 
of the advantages afforded at Bethany. 

The American Literary Institute and the Neotrophian Lit- 
erary Society began to make history in 1841 — the very year in 
which the college was founded. The college and the societies 
grew together. Each soicety was a distinct social and literary 
group within the larger college group. And with the growth of 
the societies in strength of numbers and in that sort of prestige, 
which comes with the age and character of its traditions, men 
counted it a rare honor to have membership in and to participate 
in the activities of these institutions. The class consciousness 
became so distinct that an expert might almost foretell what 
manner of man would be turned out on commencement day 
from the fashioning influences of these respective institutions. 
It was an honor to have membership in a group already famous 
because of the worth of its distinguished sons — a distinction to 
call them members of my societv and an inspiration to follow 
their lead. What social distinction, what intellectual comrad- 
ship ! How fine to feel the contagion of their ideals and aspira- 
tions and achievements ! Dreams and visions and air castles 
floated before the mind of the hope building vouth. On such 
stufi^ did their young hearts feed, and by such feeding did their 
young lives grow. 

Nothing, apart from their regular college work, has helped 
Bethany students more than the work of these literary societies. 
Their privileges were open to all. Here the Freshman made his 
oratorical debut, the Sophomore declaimed his high sounding and 
jrnate phrases, the Junior — a thing of beauty and a joy forever — 
painted his picture of hope, and the Senior pointed his hearers 
toward the serious and grave responsibilities of life. In these 
days there was no preparatory department. The lines of de- 
marcation between the classes were drawn with distinctness. If 
this rigid classification made the freshman a babe in college life 
and lore, and if the scant countenance accorded him in social 
circles reduced the circumference of his social ostentations, the 
privileges of the literary societies were granted him without 
stint and without restraint. Here he might enter forthwith and 
exploit his abilities to the full. Not only could the gifted and 



Page Sixty-One 



Ijrilliant find audience for the fullest exhibition of talent, but the 
n-ediocre and timid were accorded a cordial and sympathetic 
hearing. There was real pride and promise in these budding 
literary spirits. Lawyers and lecturers, teachers and preachers, 
were being trained to shine in public life. ]\Ien wanted to learn 
how to t:ilk in jiublic — and to talk well — entertainingly and con- 
vincingly. There was real faith in oratory and the orator. Pat- 
rick IIenr\- and liurke and Cicero and Demosthenese were the 
idols. Contests within the societies and between the societies 
were the order of the day. To train and exhibit the abilities of 
the men in debate, in oratory, in composition, in inijM'omptu 
speaking, and in declamation was the purpose of the programme. 
Rivalry was keen and strong. This life was robust and vigorous. 
Some mighty men grew and fought and wrought in these clas- 
sic struggles. Problems of state, church, science, and theology 
were siezed u]3on, grappled with, debated, and settled once for all 
by these young Titans. These were not sham-battles over shal- 
low issues. Serious young men were here thinking of deep 
things, and training for bigger ones. Intellectual gymnastics to 
be sure, Init of such a fine and classic kind that the truths that 
were learned here by these boys went into the very fibre of the 
soul and lived to grow with the growth of the man. The work 
that was dune here — well done — was done once for all. 

Here in college the youth began his candidacv for man- 
hood. Here he steeled his lance for the foeman worthv of his 
contest. Here Greek met Greek and the tug of war was on. 
In these societies Bethany men learned to forge the thunder 
bolts of Jove. Here was free speech, fair play and an open 
field. From these societies went Bethanv's noted sons: Alex- 
ander Proctor, ;\Ioses E. Lard, Charles Louis Loos, and the La- 
mars — illustrious father, and more illustrious son — . McGarvey 
and McDiarmid, McLain and Power, Champ Clark and E. O. 
Lovett, Herbert L. W'illett and J. E. Wayman, Senator Oliver 
and E. T. Williams, Oscar Schmiedel and George Darsie and 
many others, whose glory diiifereth as the ,glory of one star diff- 
ereth from that of another. 

In later years other societies sprang into being. The 
Adelphian was organized to meet the demands of that class of 
young men who were being educated here for the ministry. Af- 
ter the construction of the Carnegie Library building, which af- 
forded the society a chance to secure a separate and distinct 
room, the .\delphian society moved, and set up housekeeping in 
brand new quarters. Concurrent with this movement came a 
change of policy and a putting on of new manners. They put 



Page Sixty-Two 



away the old policy of a sermonette society and took on a new- 
one — became a full orbed literary society. They suffered a dis- 
tinct step in evolution. This was an advance. The other so- 
cieties — yet "contemporaries of their own unwasted prime" — 
extended their congratulations and accepted the challenge. 

With admission of the young ladies to the college came the 
organization of a literary society exclusively for ladies — the Os- 
solian. For a number of years this society flourished and devel- 
oped a distinct class consciousness — of an exclusively feminine 
sort. But as the college became more and more accustomed to 
its co-education status the lines of differentiation between the lit- 
erary aspirations of the sexes faded out and the co-educational 
spirit invaded and possessed the literary societies also — with one 
exception — Neotrophia has not as yet admitted the ladies to 
membership. The Ossolian, however, has refused to die, though 
it has passed through frequent and protracted illness. At pres- 
ent it exhibits signs of complete recovery. 

It is regrettable that the societies have lost much of that fine 
enthusiasm of former years and some of the good old traditions. 
To mention the causes and suggest corrections would not be 
amiss, were it possible. If we have lost our love for the moral 
impulse that lies behind the cultured college education, can we 
not regain it by cherishing the ideals of the finished and classic 
scholar? If the commercial demjand for high specialization in 
manifold fields of business and industry alure and attract our 
boys, can we not insist that the humanities should adorn and 
magnify these technical callings? The human, the aesthetic, the 
moral, the spiritual values have been and must always be the 
highest and most desirable values. It is the mission of our col- 
leges to exalt and teach these doctrines and wage a perpetual 
warfare against any teaching that subordinates these enobling 
spiritual values to any purely economic propoganda. 



Page Sixty-Three 



Adelphian Literary Society 

j^* j^* t^^ 

President J. A. Hall 

Vice President Lyda Humphrey 

Secretary Leila Clark 

Treasurer C. E. Rosterfer 

Presidents 1911-12 

Robert Hueston. John Rodgers 

jNIarv Perry. jMollie Gerke. 



Mary Adams 

Helen Abbiss 

Lois Abbiss 

Mrs. O. T. Baumgarner 

Mr. O. T. Baumgarner 

T. AL Brown 

S. Bitner 

Mary Caldwell 

Mae Cox 

Arthur Cox 

R. E. Carman 

F. L. Child 

Alyrl Cunningham 
Leila Clark 
J. A. Clark 
Lawrence Doak 

G. W. Daubenspeck 
Mr. Flax 



ROLL 

Excell Fair 
Ellis Fair 
Keziah Fair 
Sarah Gordon 
Mollie Gerke 
Mrs. Hall 
J. A. Hall 
Robert Hueston 
T. C. Horn 
Lyda Humphrey 
E. B. Hensley 
Dessie Hill 
M. E. Hoon 
H. L. Ice 
E. A. Johnston 
H. H. kidd 
Bertha Messick 
Sarah Alansell 



Elva Mann 
G. C. Neil 
G. J. Owen 
Mary Perry 
Hazel Phillips 
Clinton Pryor 
C. W. Pultz 
AL L. Fatten 
John Rodgers 
C. E. Rostefer 
Harold Smith 
Myrtle Scholes 
Robert Sparks 
C. B. Schultheis 
A. C. Scott 
Bessie Spence 
Joy Taylor 
Percy Thomas 



Page Sixty-Fonr 




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Page Sixty-Five 



American Literary Institute 

e^*' (^^ ^5^ 

Colors : — Blue and White. 

Motto — "Lux descendit-e-caelo." 



Presidents 
E. C. Smith 

Mildred Stewart 



G. C. Hettler 
\'elma Rodefer 



Secretary Wylda Millison 

Treasurer O. A. Rodefer 



ROLL 



Helen Atvvood 
Helene Beaumont 
Elizabeth Bute 
Romaine Bell 
Mary Chester 
W. A. Cope 
V^ernon Crites 
Herbert Drain 
Alverda Dnnlap 
Mary Ewing 
G. L. Ferguson 
Beulah Hamilton 
E. E. Harmon 
G. C. Hettler 
C. H. Hulme 
Edith Hunter 
W. N. Jackson 
Archie Linnville 



D. P. Morris 
Edna A[c]\laster 
Wvlda Millison 
Lee Ramsey 
Onward Rodefer 
\'elm,a Rodefer 
Dale Ross 

E. C. Smith 
Mrs. L. C. Smith 
Mildred Stewart 
W. S. Shuttlewo: 
C. P. Shropshire 
J. K. Tener 

E. H. Wrav 
Elizabeth \Vilkin 
Elsie Wilson 
Carrie Pitzer 
Elizabeth Owens 




Page Sixty-Six 




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Page Sixty-Seven 



Neotrophian Literary Society 



^^' ^^^ %p^ 

Colors :— Red and White. 
Alotto: — ' Quaerimus \'ernum.'" 

Presidents. 

F. A. Poffenberger W. S. Wilkin 

J. R. Wilkin. 

Secretary Wm. Hutchison 

Treasurer Walter Lape 



ROLL 



Robert Brooks 
Howard Blanning 
John Bergan 
Jessie Coughenour 
Paul Carabo 
Cecil Dodd 
Floyd Duffy 
John Edwards 
Frank Hesse 
Wm. Hutchinson 
Wm. Holland 
Walter Lape 
Mario Lumbard 
Helmas Miller 



Allen MiUiken 
Jacob ^litchell 
Albert Miller 
Walter McGowan 
Nesley ]Mahan 
Park McMullen 
F. A. Poffenberger 
W^ S. Wilkn 
J. R. Wilkin 
R. C. Wilkin 
Charles Welch 
Ralph Ryan 
Rapheal Menendz. 




Page Sixty-Eiijht 




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Pa{fe Sixty-Nine 



Ossolia Literary Society 



Re-established l'J12. 



I larriet Alexander 
Mary Alexander 
Josephine Barnes 
Bessie Carmen 
Nellie Dallas 
Margaret Hurt 
Blanche Hoge 
Mildred Houston 
Katherine Jack 
Ethyl Lauch 
Abigail Lesnett 
Alary Lewis 
Arabella Marvin 



ROLL 

Ethel Mc.Millen 
Xena McCausland 
Lela Moore 
Hazel Mercer 
Gladys Oliver 
Dorothy Perrin 
Grace Robertson 
Pamela Scott 
Helen Smith 
Katherine Smith 
Illah Spore 
Naida Wells 



Page Seventy 




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Page Seventy-One 



The Bethany of 1912 

George J- Owen. 

"The Bethan)' of 1912" is not the Bethany of a decade ago, — nor of a 
vear ago. Great changes have taken place and much has been done to give her 
the position she rightfully deserves among our colleges. Never was she so well 
equipped \for educational purposes: never did she appeal so strongly to the aes- 
thetic nature of man. And her glory is not yet full. Great things are still in 
store. 

With her increased endowment she is able to maintain a larger and more 
vfficient faculty than in previous years. The Bible Department has been greatly 
strengthened b\- the addition of Prof. Austin P. Finlcy in the Thomas W. Phillips 
Bible Chair. Prof. William Hill as Dean of Agriculture has placed this new 
department on a sure foundation. The added department of Domestic Science 
has been very successful under Miss Armstrong. Assistants have been appointed 
in other departments, and the teaching thus made more thorough. 

The main college building has been renovated throughout. The walls 
have been well decorated with colors that make the rooms light and cheerful. 
New hardwood floors have been laid in every classroom and on the corridor. 
Steam heaters have taken the place of the old coal stoves. The chapel hall has 
been improved in the same wa^•. The installation of the new pipe organ and the 
hanging of several large oil jiaintings have added much to the beauty of the 
chapel. 

Our campus has been graded and harmonized. The cement walks, thread- 
ing the grounds in graceful curves, with the most beautiful entrance gates of 
any American college give to Bethany a campus of which she is indeed proud. 
During the coming spring and summer scores of shrubs and plants are to decorate 
the grounds. 

In place of a few old houses at the foot of the campus, one now beholds 
one of the finest durniitories in the land. The Percy B. Cochran Hall as a dormi- 
t<jry for young men, is built on the latest improved plan. It is fireproof through- 
out. The second and third floors are arranged in suites of three rooms each ; one 
large study room with two small bed rooms. Each two suites have private baths. 
This building has added much to the comfort of the young men during the year. 
Being built of white brick with green tile roofing it is a building of fine appear- 
ance and has added immensely to the looks of the college property. 

The ruins of the upper end of the main college building have been replaced 
by the sixty thousand dollar Oglebay Agricultural and Science Hall. This build- 
ing is of the Tudor Gothic architecture in harmonv with the main college build- 
ing. It is built uf red brick with lierea sandstone trimmings. It is to contain 
four excellently ec|uipi)ed laboratories ; Chemical, Physical. Biological and Agri- 
cultural. No ex]:>ense is being saved to make these the best equipped possible, 
and to give Bethany a science equipment ec|ual to the best in this part of the 
country. It is estimated that when complete this building will be worth at least 
seventv-five thousand dollars. There will be five class rooms together with pri- 

Page Seventy-Two 



vate laboratories for the professors, balance rooms, dark rooms, and the Presi- 
dent's offices in the Oglebay Hall. 

All the buildings on the campus are now heated by steam from the cen- 
tral heating plant, donated by M. M. Cochran. This new plant has been a great 
blessing to Bethany. It has done away with the old coal stoves and their incon- 
venience, and has made things in general much more modern and comfortable. 

The Campbell farm, donated to the college by Mr. Oglebay, is being 
greatly improved. .\ new barn has been erected. New fences have been put up, 
and the whole farm is thoroughly drained. A new light and water plant has been 
installed for the college and town. A fine reservoir has been built on the hill 
above the college. Spring water has been piped directly from the spring to all 
parts of the campus. A new well equipped steam laundry where students may 
have their washing done at the lowest price possible has been put up in the town, 
and is managed by the college. Many other minor improvements have been 
made. During the coming summer the main street is to be paved and the whole 
town sewered. 

Thus the "Bethany of 1912" is an "Improved Bethany", a "New Bethany," 
a "Bethany Beautiful." But she will continue to improve. Her noble sons have 
not commenced a work to leave it unfinished. Each improvement shows us some 
other that ought to be made. We believe that the Bethanv of the future will be 
even greater than the Bethany of today. 

The student body appreciates what has been done for them and for Beth- 
any. They honor the true philanthropists who have made the "Bethany of 1912" 
possible. And above all we honor him who as president of this institution has 
brought these things to pass, whose honest and untiring efiforts are being crowned 
with success. 



«%> 



Page Seventy-Ttree 



Notes from the Diary of a Prep 

t^^ t^^ t^^ 

Sept. 19th. — Gee this is a big school. I'm glad they let me come here. Its 
nice to be around where so many freshmen are and here they can't tell who are 
freshies and who are preps only by the clothes the freshies wear. They always 
go dressed in such loud colors. Some day I'll be a freshman. Gee it must be 
great to be a freshman and in the real college. 

Sept. 24th. — .All the students went on biz to church last night. It must 
be nice to go on biz with a college girl. When I get out of the prep department 
I am going to hunt up a bizite. But I have some consolation, there are so many 
preps here. There must be as many in our department as there are in the reg- 
ular college. Anyhow I wish I was out of the preps. 

Oct. 4th. — One of them seniors passed me on the corridor this morning. 
He was coming from the book store with his new hooks. They were big ones. 
One of them would make all four of mine. They must k'now a lot to study in 
them kind of books. 

Nov. 17th. — Those seniors gave their orations last night. They wore 
long gowns and caps. All dressed in black. It looked like a funeral. That Mr. 
Smith sure gave a great speech on Oliver Cromwell. I wish I could talk like 
him. He didn't seemed to get scared at all. When I get to be a senior I am 
going to make a speech on "The World's Great Problem." 

Dec. 19th. — Oh e.xams are here! If I had just studied! But that language 
lesson was so hard and Miss Dickson made it harder than she oughter. Arithme- 
tic is harder here in college than it was back home in grammar school. I'm 
afraid that I will flunk. 

Jan. 1(1. — We are all freezing. It is fine to have nothing to do. If I had 
some fine clothes like that feller Wray has so I could go around dressed up all 
the time it would be better. It was fun to see the President digging in that ditch 
all night last night. He didn't look like a president then. 

Feb. 2Gth. — Well the frats have banquets and the seniors and juniors 
have banquets and even the sophs and fresh have banquets here in Bethany, but 
we poor preps have to eat crackers and belonie in our rooms. The senior girls 
entertain the senior boys last night. They must have had a fine time. I wonder 
why they never have any use for the preps. 

March 23rd. — O the freshies and sophs had a scrap last night! You just 
aught to have seen the way big Smith knocked those poor freshies around. The 
freshies tied the sophs president up and that is why they fought. But the fresh- 
ies whipped the sophs. They couldn't have done it but for a lot of our preps help- 
ing them out. I didn't, I was afraid to. I don't want to get Big Smith and Milli- 
ken and fellers like that after me. But I am glad that the freshies whipped. 

June 13. — Well commencement is over. All the folks are going home. 
I'm going to stay in summer school so I can hurry up and be a freshman. I won- 
der how it feels to graduate. All the seniors looked so nice today Everybody 
talked about them and wanted to be with them, liut nobody loves a prep. We 
just have to hang around and look on and keep quiet. But by the time I am here as 
long as Slifer and Ice I'll be a senior too. I heard Ice say that he had been here since 
Noah built the ark. But there is one feller that been here longer than that. 
Moody Edwards has been here since a year before Noah built the ark. He is only 
a junior too. But he don't study, he preaches too much. Well good bye seniors! 
Don't know what we will do without you next year. But I'll be nearly a freshman 
then and I'll try to fill your place as much as I can. 



Page Seventy-Four 










o'" 





E. C. SMITH 

E. C. Smith has again won first honors at home and for a second time 
he will represent Bethany in the Tri-State contest. We confidently expect Beth- 
any to win first place in the contest this year. The final comes ofif at home. With 
his Own people to inspire him Mr. Smith will win. He is a spirited speaker of 
the most modern type, direct, natural, and forceful. In fact his oratory is the 
type that uses no tricks except mastery of the subject, and a direct, conversa- 
tional presentation of the same. 

The preliminary contest this year was very close. All the contestants dis- 
played the best spirit and all wanted to see the best man win. Harry L. Ice was 
a close second to Mr. Smith, and Geo. J. Owen came in third. More men should 
have entered the contest. Where we had only four men in it we should have had 
at least eight. There is no field of collegiate activities that gives greater reward 
than the training and experience which is received by those wlio take an active 
interest in oratory and debate. This is the one activity in school which trains 
men for work in after life, while preparing them for the immediate work of rep- 
resenting the college. This fact is being recognized more and more each 3'ear, 
and accordingly, oratory is coming to its own. The Wilfley contest ofifers a good 
inducement for Bethany's orators to make greater efforts along this line. 



Paye Seventy-Five 



FIRST DEBATING TEAM 




E. C. Smith George J. Owen Harry L. Ice 

(Negative Team Against Westminster) 



SECOND DEBATING TEAM 




W. A. Cope 



Page SeTenty-Six 



F. A. Poffenberger 



W. S. Wilkin 



Oratory and Debate at Bethany 

^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

The debating association this year inckides two strong teams. The teams 
are composed entirely of seniors. The first team, which is to meet Westminister 
on April 26th. is composed of E. C. Smith, Geo. J. Owen and Harry L. Ice. This 
team is to debate the negative side of the question of the recall of judges. We are 
not prophets but we predict that Westminister will have a hard time defeating this 
team. All of these men are experienced speakers and would compare favorably 
with most university teams. The second team, composed of ^^^ A. Cope, F. \. 
Foffenberger. and W. S. Wilkin, will meet one of the many colleges that want 
to debate with us. This team is composed of good men and they will give some 
college a race for victory. 

Bethany has but within the last three years entered the field of inter- 
collegiate debates. But she is not slow to recognize a good thing, so she has 
entered the field with a determination to make the best of it. We believe that only 
that art can endure which is founded upon the principles of Sincerity. Honesty. 
Simplicit}', and Thoroness. Preparation is the one most essential thing. Our 
thoughts must stand on their own merit. We can only give them artistic ex- 
pression. Whether Bethany wins or looses, we shall have the satisfaction of 
having done our best. Armed with the proper moral backing, we shall go into 
our debates to win — and win we shall. 

That department of education which deals with expression is today re- 
ceiving more and more emphasis. Xot only those working in the field of ex- 
pression, but all liberal educators are awakening to the real value of teaching and 
training the young men and women the art of expressing themselves well. Busi- 
ness men tell us that much of the education in our colleges today is theoretical 
and impressional, and that the student is unable to apply it when he goes out into 
real life. Surely such knowledge is not power. In our broader views of the edu- 
cation of today we are beginning to understand that in the experimental labora- 
tory- of expression we are discovering new truths within the individual student, 
that we are investigating these new truths and bringing to light latent powers, 
of which the student was never aware. Yes. in this same laboratory of expression, 
not only are we dscovering. but we are vitalizing truth already known and dis- 
covered, materials furnished from other sources are here made into more poten- 
tial working principles. Here logical thinking, unimpared judgment, and critical 
sense of appreciation are made more ser\Mcable to the student. In times past the 
Lecture and Recital platform the Bench and the Bar, and Pulpit claimed the 
finished product of oraton.-, but today the shop, the office, and the parlor offer un- 
told blessings for those who have learned to give pleasing and clear expressions to 
their thoughts. The passing era gave rise to noble conceptions, furnished great 
ideas, and propagated sublime schem.es : we m.ust send out young men and 
women better fitted to realize these conceptions, ideas and schemes in sublime 
achievement. First there must be thought, but first, last and all the time must 
be the application of these ideas to life. These very ideas must be vitalized and 
incarnated until the individuality and personality of college men and women, 
through this very expressional process, will be first and highest in the world, 
making them the leaders in that actual life of thought and action, until their 
initiative and aggressive personalities will be able to meet and work out the .great 
world problems. 

It is the aim and purpose of Bethany's oratory to bring about this very 
result ; to create men and women who have power in themselves to bring things 
to pass. 



Pa^ SeTentT-Seven 



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page Seventy-Eigfit 



"EVERYMAN" 



On the evening of March T), 1012, the students of the Enghsh department 
presented to the largest audience that has been seen in the Ijcthany College 
Chapel for years, the old .Mnralit)- play "Everyman." Fifteen students, taken 
from the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior English classes acted the several parts 
and in a highly credible manner revived this old time drama. 

The play was not given ])rimarily to entertain, hut in order that those who 
are interested in the modern drama might see its forerunner as it was produced in 
the 16th century. "Everyman" was ])robabl\- written in the latter part of the 
16th century and was ]5roduced in some such manner as the students pre- 
sented it. The several actors came out of the audience to the stage and there was 
little or no attempt at scenerv. The theology of the time is well shown in the 
dialogue and the personification of abstractions such as Strength, Beauty, Good 
Deeds, etc., is in perfect keeping with the manner of instruction of that time. 

The cast is printed below and without an exception the acting was well 
done and the lines deli\-ercd with effect. Too much credit can not be given to 
Mrs. Bourne, the head of the Department, for her aid and supervision. The 
costumes and effects were all designed b\' her and the success that was attained 
was only brought about I)\' hours of patient labor on her part. Much talent is 
discovered in a play of this sort and the ones who have had this one in charge 
hope it may serve as a precedent and that the English department may each 
year present some instructive form of the English drama. 

CHARLES H. HULME. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 



Everyman George Owens 

Death E. H. Wray 

Fellowship Frank Hesse 

God J. R. Glenn 

Kindred G. H. Barger 

Strength Edwin Wells 

Messenger Charles H. Hulmc 

Five Wits F. C. Milbury 



Beauty Mary Chester 

Riches Wylda Alillison 

Good Deeds Minnie Smith 

Discretion Mary Perry 

Knowledge Alverta Dunlap 

Confession Mildred Stewart 

Angel Elizabeth Butte 




Paye S».venty-Nine 



Collegian Staff 



Editor-inChief George J. Owen 

Assistant Editor F. A. Poffenberger 

Exchange Editor Robert C. Wilkin 

Afinisterial Editor T. C. Horn 

Athletic Editor William S. Wilkin 

Literary Editor Enoch C. Smith 

Alumni Editor Miss Lee Ramsey 

iMiss Mary Chester 
C. E. Rostefer 
J. P. McMullen 

Business Manager Onward A. Rodefer 

Assistant Piusiness Manager W. AL Xorment 



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Page Eighty-Three 



Young Women's Christian Association 

Color :— White. 

Motto: — "Not by might nor by power, 
but by my spirit saith the Lord of 
Hosts." 

OFFICERS. 

Mildred Stewart President 

Mrs. J. A. Hall Vice President 

Velma Rodefer Secretary 

Elizabeth Cox Treasurer 



ROLL 



Helen Abbiss 
Lois Abbiss 
Helene Atwood 
Josephene Barnes 
Helen Beaumont 
Romaine Bell 
Elizabeth Bute 
Mary Caldwell 
Mary Chester 
Leila Clark 
Elizabeth Cox 
Mae Cox 
Nellie Dallas 
Alverda Dunlap 
Mabel Eberle 
Mary Ewing 
Amelia Gerke 
Sara Gordon 
Mrs. J. A. Hall 
Beulah Hamilton 
Dessie Hill 
Blanch Hoge 
Lyda Humphrey 
Edith Hunter 
Katherine Jack 
Abigail Lesnett 
Pearle IMahaffey 



Elva Mann 
Arabella ]\Iarvin 
Hazel ]\Iercer 
Bertha IMessick 
Wylda Alillison 
Lula McCausland 
Ethel McMillen 
Dorothy Perrin 
Mary Perry 
Hazel Phillips 
Lee Ramsey 
Grace Robertson 
Velma Rodefer 
Dale Ross 
]\Iyrtle Scholes 
Pamela Scott 
Helen Sherlock 
Helen Smith 
Katherine Smith 
Elizabeth Gatts-Smith 
Bessie Spence 
Illah Spore 
Mildred Stewart 
Elizabeth Wilkin 
Elsie Wilson 
Lucy Wilson 



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Y. M. C. A. 

**** 

(OFFICERS. 

C. H. Hulme President 

J. A. Hall \'ice President 

C. E. Rostofer Secretary 

William Wilkin Treasurer 



John R. Clark 
Arthur T. Cox 
H. L. -Miller 
J. K. Tener 
Harry Schultheis 

E. A. Johnston 
C. E. Rostofer 
C. H. Hulme 
Robert Hueston 
Wililam Wilkin 
W. F. Jackson 

F. A. Poffenberger 
Lawrence R. Doak 

F. L. Child 

G. L. Fergxison 



MEMBERS 

C. W. Pultz 
F. C. Milbury 
W. E. Wells 
David Harris 
Percy Thomas 
C. E. Smith 
T. C. Horn 
J. A. Hall 
Excell Fair 
( ). A. Rodefer 
( ). T. Baumgarner 
James Wilkin 
Robert Gibson 
vVilliam Holland 
Clifton Teisher 




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Volunteer Mission Band 

Moody Edwards President 

Sarah Mansell Secretary 

MEMBERS 
Mr. O. T. Baumgarner 
Mrs. O. T. Baumgarner 
Thomas M. Brown 
Wilbur W. Carter 
Finney L. Child 
Moody Edwards 
Edgar A. Johnston 
Sarah Mansell 
Bertha ^lessick 
Myrtle Scholes 



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PatJe Eighty-Nine 



Young Ladies' Bible Class 

Lee Ramsey President 

Velma Rodefer Vice President 

Elva Mann Secretary 

Mrs. J. A. Hall Treasurer 



Helen Abbiss 
Lois Abbiss 
Helen Atwood 
Fannie Atcheso' 
Helene Beaumont 
Josephine Parnes 
Myrle Cunningham 
Elizabeth Cox 
Alae Cox 
Mary Chester 
Leila Clark 
NeUie Dallas 
Alverda Dunlap 
Mabel Eberle 
Mary Ewing 
Mrs. Evans 
Amelia Gerke 
Peulah Hamlton 
Edith Hunter 
Blanche Hoge 
Dessie Hill 
Mildred Houston 
Lyda Humphrey 
Mrs. Hall 
Kathtrine Jack 



ROLL 

Mary Lewis 
Abigail Lesnett 
Arabella Marvin 
Pearl IVIahaffey 
Edna McMasters 
Ethel McAIillen 
Hazel Mercer 
Bertha Messick 
Lela Moore 
Hazel Phillips 
Mary Perry 
Dale Ross 
Mildred Stewart 
Katherine Smith 
Pamela Scott 
Mrs. E. C. Smith 
Ella Stauffer 
Mrs. Sloan 
Bessie Spence 
Illah Spore 
Joy Taylor 
Mrs. Wheat 
Elizabeth Wilkin 
Elsie Wilson 
Lucv Wilson 



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Young Men's Bible Class 

Motto: — "Quit ye like men, be 
strong." 

(Prof. Frank R. Gay, (Teacher.) 

Helmes Miller President 

Robert Hueston Vice President 

C. E. Rostefer Secretary 

F. A. Poffenberafer Treasurer. 



G. C. Neil 
Harold Smith 
Lawrence Doak 
W. O. Depp 
Pablo Alegre 

F. L. Childs 
Harry Schultheis 
Cecil' B. Dodd 
Rudolph Renner 
Perry Morris 
Percy Thomas 
Hulbert H. Kidd 
A. C. Scott 

W. D. Butler 
Huber Drain 

G. W. Daubenspeck 
William Wilkin 
Ralph Ryan 

J. W. Coughenour 
James Wilkin 
J. P. McMullen 
M. Lumbard 



CLASS ROLL 
J. P. Rodger 
C. E. Welsh 
David Harris 
G. M. Fuller 
Edwin Wells 
Ernest Harmon 
Robert Sparks 
J. P. Cooper 
Joseph Henry 
O. A. Rodefer 
Lyman G. Blood 
J. R. Sloan 
J. A. Clark 
H. A. Seel 
R. E. Smith 
C. W. Pultz 
S. F. Bittner 
A. M. Flax 
W. A. Cope 
N. W. Evans 
F. W. Duffee 
J. W. Mitchell 



Floyd Smith 
Robert Brooks 
William Jackson 
Howard Blanning 
J. K. Tener 
William Holland 
Rafael Menendez 
Maynard L. Patton 
E. A. Johnston 
Walter Funk 
George Owen 
Charles Sauffer 
Miles Hoon 
Frank Hesse 
R. D. Beck 
Robert Wilkin 
Charles Ryan 
Edwin Gordon 
J. R. Clark 
Clifton Teisher 
George Hettler 
G. H. Barger 
Allen ^lilliken 



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Mission Study Class 

Arthur T. Cox President 

Aloody Edwards Vice President 

Dessie I. Hill Secretary 

Prof. A. P. Finlev Teacher 



Lois Abbiss 
O. T. Baumgarner 
Mrs. Baumgarner 
P. E. Britton 
Thomas Brown 
Mary Caldwell 
F. L. Child 
Mae Cox 
A. T. Cox 
Lawrence Doak 
Moody Edwards 
J. Edwards 
Excell Fair 
A. M. Flax 
Mrs. A. M. Flax 
Prof. A. P. Finley 
Mrs. A. P. Finley 
J. R. Glenn 
Alollie Gerke 
Dessie Hill 
Wm, Heck 
Lyda Humphrey 
E. B. Hensley 
Mrs. J. A. Hall 
T. C. Horn 
Mrs. T. C. Horn 
W. N. Jackson 



ROLL 

E. A. Johnston 
David Morris 
T. C. Milbury 
Arabella Marvin 
Sarah Mansell 
Elva Mann 

W. M. Norment 
Geo. C. Neil 
Geo. J. Owen 
C. W. Pultz 
M. L. Patton 

F. A. Poffenberger 
John P. Rodgers 
Velma Rodefer 

O. A. Rodefer 
C. E. Rostefer 
Mrs. E. C. Smith 
E. C. Smith 
Charles Sauffer 
Mildred Stewart 
Bessie Spence 
H. B. Schultheis 
Robert Sparks 
Percy Thomas 
Elsie Wilson 
E. H. Wray 



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Page Ninety-Five 




PASTORATES HELD BY BETHANY STUDENTS 



Page Ninety-Sis 




FRATERNITY HOUSES 



Page Ninety-Seven 



Alpha XI Delta Fraternity 

Founded at Lombard College, 1893. 

Colors : — Dark Blue, Light Blue and 
Gold. 

Flower : — Pink Rose. 

Oificial Organ: — Alpha Xi Delta 
Journal. 

DELTA CHAPTER 

Established 1!)(I3. 

Patronesses 

Mrs. F. T. McEvoy .Mrs. O. G. \\'hite 
Mrs. Sabina Lewis Mrs. J. C. Moos 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Seniors 

Hazel Merle Mercer. 

Mildred Stewart. 

Clara Mae Cox. 

Mary Gwendolyn Lewis 

Sophomores 

Ethel Irene McMillen. 
Abigail Jane Lesnett. 



Juniors 

Elizabeth Gatts-Smith 

Margaret Elizabeth Hurt. 

Velma Rodefer. 

Freshmen 

Helen Baker Smith. 
Arabella Bedia Marvin. 
Pamela VMorill Scott 




Page Ninety-Eiglit 







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i:nP'YFfJ3i-ir Jh -5 B-r 7«Kir«*?3H EXz^iUTT nu 



I 




ALPHA XI DELTA FRATERNITY 



Page Ninety-Nine 



Zeta Tau Alpha Fraternity 

Founded at Farn\-ille, \'irgir.ia, 1898. 

Colors; — Turquoise Blue and Steel 
Gray. 

Flower : — White \^iolet. 

THETA CHAPTER 

Established March 0, 1905. 

Patronesses 

Mrs. W. T. Nichols, Mrs. A. R. Bourne 
Mrs. A. C. Workman. 



ROLL 



Seniors 

Elizabeth Cox. 

Elizabeth M. Bute 

Mary Chester 

Lee Ramsey 

Sophomores 

Dale Ross 

Elizabeth Wilkin 

Alverda Dunlap 

Elsie W'ilson 

Edith Hunter 

Romaine Bell 

Myrle Cunnin<.;ham ( ]:iledge) 



Juniors 

Edna McMaster 
Marv Ewins: 



Freshmen 

Hazel Phillips 
Helene Beaumont 




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Sigma Nu Fraternity 

Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 
18G9. 

Colors : — Black, White and Gold. 

Flower : — White Rose. 



EPSILON CHAPTER 



Seniors 
W. A. Cope. 



Sophomores 

R. M. Brooks 
H. A. Blanning 
J. B. Webster 
W. W. Canaga 



Pledges 

G. N. Fuller 

W. N. Jackson 

Wm. Hutchison. 




Juniors 

C. H. Hulme 

E. H. Wray 

W. E. Wells 

W. M. Norment 

W. S. Shuttleworth 

E. E. Harmon 

J. K. Tener 

Freshmen 

T. N. Mahan 
J. H. Burgan 
G. H. Barger 



Page One Hundred and Two 




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Pa^e One Handred and Three 



Kappa Alpha Fraternity 

Founded at Washington and Lee 
University, I8G0. 

Colors : — Crimson and Old Gold. 

Flowers : — Red Rose and Magnolia. 

BETA BETA CHAPTER 

Established l!)u:). 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Seniors 

William S. Wilkin 

George J. Owen 

James R. Wilkin 

George C. Hettler 

Sophomores 

Robert C. Wilkin 
John O. McNeeley 



Juniors 

Onward A. Rodefer 
Helmas L. Miller 

Pledge 
J. W. ^litchell 

Freshmen 

Rees S. Lloyd 

Frank J\L Hesse 

L Park McAIullen 

William D. Butler 

Andrew McGinley 

Courtland P. Shropshire 




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Betta Theta Pi Fraternity 

Founded at Miami University 1839. 
Colors : — Pink and Blue. 
Flower : — American Beauty Rose. 

PSI CHAPTER 
Established December 7, 1860. 

Prater in Facilitate 
Phillijj Johnson. 



ROLL. 



Seniors 

Roy Slifer 

F. .\. Pofifenberger 

Enoch C. Smith 

Sophomores 

Clifton Teisher 
Earl E. Blair - 
Floyd Smith 

R. Donald Beck 
John Smith 

\'ernon Crites 



Juniors 

Archie Linville 



Freshmen 

Wilfred Larimer 

Pledges 

M. Glenn Robertson 

E. W. Lape 

W. F. Wilson 




Page One Handred and Six 




BETTA THETA PI FRATERNITY 



Page One Handred and Seven 




Page One Hundred and Eight 





H T H t M ^ 





Page One Hondred and Nine 





^^^■pi^' -^ ^v^^^^^^^H 




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W. S. WILKIN, Manager 



L. H. Shropshire 
L. T. Harmon 
L. 0. Rodders 
C. Wells 



WEARERS OF THE "B" 

R H. Carnaga R. E. Cope 

R. G. Childs F. B. Smith, Llovd 

R. T. Webster O. B. Shuttleworth (Capt.) 
L. E. Blaning', MiUikin 



SUBS 

Robertson, Allen, Linville, Conkiling, Rodefer, ^^'allace. 

THE SCORES 

Sept. 30th at Alliance Mt. L'nion 46 Bethan\ 



Oct. 7 at Washington W. & J 43 

Oct. 14 at Bethany Wavnesburg 

Oct. 2?th at Bethany Statt A. C 

Nov. 4th at East Liverpool Hiram 27 

Nov. 11 at Marietta Marietta 30 

Nov. ISth at Beaver Falls Geneva 

Waynesburg cancelled the game for Thanksgiving Day. 





Bethany 

Bethany 5 

Bethany 5 

Bethany 3 

Bethany o 

Bethanv 



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Page One Hundred and Eleven 



Bethany's Gridiron 

^* t^* Jr* 

Bethany College for the past two years has been rapidly advancing in 
her educational system. An Agricultural department was added last fall, the 
scinetific department is making gigantic strides toward the university type, the 
lecture room is slowly replacing recitation room, her faculty has been strength- 
ened by the acquisition of men who have a national reputation in the depart- 
ment which they represent. With all these improvements the prospect for higher 
and better education at Bethany was never more promising. 

But while these changes were taking place within her historic walls, Beth- 
any was winning a place of prominence on the athletic field. In the spring of 1010 
she defeated at baseball Carnegie Tech, Waynesburg College, Pittsburg Collegian, 
St. Vincent College and other teams of lesser note. The following fall Bethany 
won a stubbornly contested football battle from \\^ & J. and played a no score 
game with I'niversity of ^^^ A'a.. these two games in themselves are positive 
proof of the increasing prowess of Bethany's gridiron heroes. 

The fall of Bill ushererl in a new era in Bethany athletics. Hitherto the 
eligibility rules were not sufficiently strict for the College to enjoy the pleasures 
of clean athletics. But at the opening of the school the faculty passed rules which 
required every individual participating in intercollegiate contests to be a bona 
fide student and to have at least a passing grade in all his studies. An athletic 
Board of Control, comj^osed of three ]irofessors and two students, was also or- 
ganized. 

This elevation of the standard of athletics has had several good efifects 
not only has it raised the standard of scholarship of those plaving on the various 
teams but it has placed Bethany in the good grace of those institutions which 
liave similar elegibilit\' rules. Tt als(T promises to be the means of securing ad- 
mittance to a certain intercollegial conference. This would have a very desir- 
able effect for in the past mana,gers have had some difificult\' to complete their 
schedule. \\'ith this relationship sufficient games could be secured without 
trouble. 

In view of the industrial and educational progress of this institution, the 
new buildings and the new dei^artments we would expect to see a great number 
of students in her classic halls. This means more athletic material, and more ma- 
terial with the increase athletic facilities promises to place Bethany's athletic 
reputation on a plane never e(|uale(l before. 

\V. S. SHUTTLEWORTH. 




Page One Hnndred and Twelve 




Page One Hnndted and Thirteen 




J. M. SMITH, Manager 



WEARERS OF THE "B" 

L. F, Shro])shire, Miller 

R. F. Beck 

C. Shuttleworth 

R. G. Wells (Capt.) 

L. G. Smith, Wilkin 



THE SCORES 

At Bethany ^larietta 

At Beaver Falls Geneva 

At Marietta Marietta 

At Barbersville Morris Harvey 

At Huntington Marshall College 

At Bethany Carnegie Tech. . 

At Bethany Geneva 

At Bethany Belmont Club . 



.15 Bethany 33 

.53 Bethany 13 

.41 Bethany 28 

.22 Bethany 36 

. 35 Bethany 26 

.15 Bethanv 26 

.20 Bethany 26 

.21 Bethany 18 



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Page One Hundred and Fifteen 



Basket Ball 



When at the opening of school last fall only two of preceding year's foot- 
ball regulars returned, the prospect for a good team did not look very bright. 
However, there was an abundance of raw material and the work of moulding a 
football machine was begun. 

After a week of hard practice the team began to look better. They jour- 
neyed to Mt. Union with confident expectations of victory. The Bethany team 
went up aganst better coached and better trained athletes and the natural result 
was a crushing defeat. 

The services of coach Miller were dispensed with as he was entirely in- 
capable of handling the team. This left us without a coach the week preceding 
the W. & J. game. 

Under the disadvantage of not having a coach and going into almost 
certain defeat, the team played a game of which the College may justly be proud. 
.'\gainst overwhelming odds in weight and training and on a slippery field the 
team fought for every inch of ground. Men have to have real stuff in them to 
pla)' an up-hill game and keep fighting the wav they did. Any one who saw 
the game will say that W. & J. worked hard for every touch down they made. 

Waynesburg College came to Bethany expecting an easy victory. They 
were doomed to bitter disappointment for the Bethany gridiron warriors, smart- 
ing from two successive defeats, were not to be stopped easily, and in the third 
perioid, one of the backs carried the ball around right end for a touchdown. 

Following this game we were verv fortunate in securing "Prex" Merrill 
of West Virginia University for coach. Under his direction the team improved 
rapidly, and by the latter part of the season it was working like a machine. 

The following week Bethany defeated Staats Athletic Club five to nothing 
in a hard contested game. 

The next game was with fliram College at East Liverpool. Although 
Hiram defeated us we have the satisfaction of knowing that the}- did not win 
from our regular team as several of our best players were out of the game on 
account of injuries. 

Although Marietta defeated us by a large score we showed signs of im- 
provement and on the following Saturday we played a no-score game with 
Geneva. 

The last game of the season was against the Staats Club of Wheeling. 
Bethany completely outplayed them and scored a touchdown which the referee 
would not allow, claiming a foul. 

This team is a splendid example of what steadfast determination and 
bull dog tenacity will accomplish. Surmounting successive defeats they stuck 
to it until at last they were able to triumph over their adversaries. 

W. EDWIN WELLS, Jr. 



Pa^e One Handred and Sixteen 



BASE-BALL 




-GAfwB- 



Paiie One Handred and SercDteen 




ROBERT HUESTON, Manager 



It is a little earlj' to predict anj'thing for our baseball team. But we are 
confident that coach McEvoy will be able to work up a good team with the 
materal he now has. Manager Hueston has arranged a pretty stiff schedule 
as a glance below will prove. 

THE SCHEDULE 

April 'Jth. West Liberty at Bethany. 

April 16th, Wheeling League at Wheeling. 

April 17, ]\Iorris Harvey at Barbersville. 

April 18, Marshall College at Huntington. 

April 24, ]\Iorris Harvey at Bethany. 

April 27th, L'niversity of Pittsburg at Bethany. 

May 3rd, Pittsburg College at Pittsburg. 

May 4th, L'niversity of Pittsburg at Pittsburg. 

May 27th, Pittsburg College at Bethany. 

June 12th and 13th, Pittsburg Collegians at Bethany. 



Pa^Je One Hundred and Eighteen 




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German Club 

Professor Herman Deutsch ..President 

Enoch C. Smith Vice-President 

Hazel M. Mercer, Secretary-Treasurer 



ROLL 



E. W. Lape 
Robert Wilkin 
J. K. Mitchell 
R. M. Brooks 
Vernon Crites 
J. M. Smith 
E. C. Smith 
J. B. Webster 
W. A. Cope 
W. W. Canaga 
W. N. Robertson 
Frank Hesse 
E. E. Harmon 
Ainslee Moore 
Pearl Mahaffey 



Lulu McCausland 
Mary Alexander 
Wylda Millison 
Edith Hunter 
Mary Evving 
Elizabeth Cox 
Hazel ]\lercer 
Lee Ramsey 
Edna McMasters 
Abigail Lesnett 
Katherine Smith 
Helen Smith 
Mabel Eberly 
Myrtle Scholes 
Joy Taylor 



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Rechabite Club 

Founded September 20, 1909. 

Motto: — Of the Rechabites, for the 
Rechabites, by the Rechabites. 

Arthur T. Cox President 

Robert Hueston Manager 



John L. Becktel 
Stanley F. Bittner 
Lyman G. Blood 
William D. Butler 
Thomas Brown 
Ralph E. Carman 
Wilbur W. Carter 
John Allen Clark 
John Ray Clark 
Finney L. Child 
.\rthur T Cox. 
Geo. Wiley Dauben: 
William O. Depp 



MEMBERS 

Moody Edwards 
Robert Hueston 
Edgar Allan Johnston 
Mrs. Janet Johnston 
Hulbert H. Kidd 
Sarah Mansell 
.A.ndrew McGinlev 
Allen P. Milliken 
Charles W. Pultz 
Clarence E. Rostofer 
Roy E. Smith 

;peck James R. Wilkin 
Robert C. Wilkin 



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Pajje One Handred and Twenty-Foar 



Immanuel Kant 

W. A. Cope. 

An analysis of the eighteenth century shows an inevitable tendency toward 
the re-discovery of new aspects and passions in life and literature. The period 
[ireceding this has been one of thoughtful study of the inner life. It refused to 
regard the deeper beauty of the universe but to see only cold facts and abstract 
p'-oblems. Everything was explained by the consciousness of the inner self. Im- 
pressions and ideas made up the sum total of human knowledge. Then the Lock- 
ian philosophy produced a skepticism that found its chief advocate in Hume. He 
raised the problem that the inner life gave nothing but impressions and ideas and 
was but mere sophistry and illusion. He is truly imsympathetic and mercilessly 
critical, but it is the reflection of a thoughtful man. Hume strove for a trancend- 
ent knowledge for humanity ; and with this thought we may look to Kant. 

Immanuel Kant was born in 1724: in the city of Konigsberg, within the 
province of East Prussia, and he never left that province. His familv was poor 
and his father of Scotch descent. His father toiled as a saddlemaker, and in 
religious faith was a pietist. The Kant family lived in a cheerful, harmonious 
manner, and in a sense, dispassionate. At school, Kant was a remarkably pre- 
cocious child. At the outset of his literary career, he was an investigator, a 
man of literary skill and broad-minded. His school and university days were 
wonderful times for him. It was there that he learned the unusual devotion to a 
solution of a speculative problem. His external life was ever one of undeviating 
routine — his lectures, his daily walk, his dinner with friends and his hours of re- 
flection upon his great problem. Let us now turn to the thought and problem 
of Kant. 

The problem that Kant had before him was that of epistemology. This 
is the theory of knowledge and Kant set to work to investigate the knowing pro- 
cesses. He put the simple question "What can we know?" At this period, 
when Kant agreed with Wolff in respect to his dualism, i. e., the great gulf be- 
tween mind and matter. Kant ]5roferred the longer question "What can we know 
about the external world?" 

Kant pointed out two methods for philosophical criticism, namely the 
dogmatic and transcendental. The former, he said, was the method of the past, 
simply classical interpretation, and had proved itself fallacious. The latter was 
the method to which Kant endeavored to conform. To him that was the true 
method. As the name implies, it was a criticism, dealing with our experiences. 
It was a study of the nature of reason. Tudgments of any sort must have a uni- 
versality beyond human experience. The transcendental is indispensable to 
knowledge. 

Let us now notice one of Kant's greatest contributions. As we have 
mentioned Wolfif's twofold world of mind and matter, it is easy to link Kant 
with this question of philosophical dualism. Kant never whollv gave us this 
dualistic view, but he broadened the question into a three-fold world as follows : 
First, subjective states; second, phenomena — the realm of knowledge: and third, 
things in themselves. 

The first world belongs to the individual and no one else. It is the realm 
of intuition, and the individual's own ideas and impressions. It is the world in 
which the Ego lives. It is a realm that gives individuality and personality. No 
one shares it with us. 

The world of things in themselves is not the realm of human knowledge. 
It is not a world of material bodies and nature objects. It is the unknown and 
unknowable. Kant says we do not know "what" it is, but we know "that" it is. 
Nothing but a divine intelligence knows the world of things in themselves. 

The phenomena, or realm of knowledge, is the realm of physical nature 

Page One Handred and Twenty-Five 






or the realm of experience. It is the common knowledge of humanity. It is the 
totality of nature. However, it constitutes for us only relative reality This 
world is a relationship of experiences, and this Kant terms phenomena. 

The synthesis idea of Kant is important to note. He maintained that the 
mind was ever engaged in collecting and relating ideas. Sensation plus the 
unifying power equates knowledge. Synthesis is not the product of knowing, but 
the process. It is the creative phase that all minds have. When the mind acts it 
synthesizes. Kant proceeds further and says judgments are indispensible to 
knowledge. He divides them into analytic and synthetic. An analytic judgment 
simply expresses in the predicate something of usual meaning. It states nothing 
new, and is never an instrument for advanced thought. A synthetic judgment is 
one that implies new meanings and enriched kowledge of the subject in hand. 
It is sometimes called an amplitive judgment. However, Kant savs all synthetic 
judgments are not processes of true knowledge. He makes still another division 
into a postiori and a priori. The former are those founded on experience and 
form generalized facts, and are only probably true in that there may be excep- 
tions beyond our observation. By the latter, Kant means the unversal and nec- 
essary, and these, and these only, constitute absolute knowledge. When we say 
two right angles are equivalent to a straight angle, we state something universal 
and necessary. 

Kant now leads us into another field equally interesting. This phase of 
his philosophy is his conception of time and space relative to knowledge. To 
hurry on, we may say, that in actual couscous experience, sensations never come 
to us in their own distinctiveness. They never enter the mind unless they bear 
the mark of time and space. We cannot think or feel without realizing we are 
gaining consciousness through time and space. Xo process can work independ- 
ently of them. 

Kant wishes to know, and so raises the C|uestion, as to wherein the validity 
of knowledge or understanding exists. Understanding is the true facultv of 
knowledge, so he therefore points out that in universals only does true knowl- 
edge exist. It is then only by synthetic a priori judgments that this validity 
is proved. Philosophers since Aristotle have tried to reason in general terms 
called categories. So does Kant try to find something general or absolute. He 
is searching for synthetic categories in opposition to the analytic categories of 
Aristotle. He postulated these as being universal to every human mind. We 
will not name his four general categories, for we cannot discuss them in such a 
brief paper. It is sufficient to say that Kant regarded them as qualities in which 
the validities of knowledge found refuge. 

In a very general way that touches the prominent phases of Kant's episte- 
mology. His philosophy does not end here, however. He enters other avenues 
of thought, and even in those you may see his ever epistemological problems crop- 
ping out. He constructs a rational psychology in the idea of a soul : an idea of 
the universe with his cold, vague antinomys ; an idea of God ; and a system of 
ethics manifested in his Practical Peason, in which he puts forth his postulate of 
freedom, his postulate of the immorality of the soul, and his postulate of the ex- 
istence of God. 

Immanuel Kant was one of the greatest investigators of philosophical 
systems the world ever saw. He is a figure that stands out in modern times as 
the pinnacle of the power of thought. He is obscure, vet inspiring. Amidst all 
his subtlety and skepticism, the true student of philosophy finds a solace. 



Page One Hundred and Twenty-Six 



i 



College Recipes 



»♦♦♦ 

How to Make an Ordinary "Prep." 
Procure a large green product of the genus homo, preferrably fresh from the 
country. Dip it briskily in creek water, repeat this treatment until all traces of 
starch have wholly disappeared. Prepare the following ingredients — three full 
terms of Latin roots, three terms of well-flunked Algebra, add a pinch of Biology, 
Botany, and Physiography, if spices are desired. Pour slowly over this mixture, 
to prevent curdling, three measures of O. T. H. Grind for three years. Stuff into 
the hollowed cranium of the specimen and roast thoroughly in the academic fire, 
tasting at frequent intervals. If care is taken in following directions, the result 
will be a "prep" suitable for ordinary purposes. 

How To Make A Freshman. 
Mince the following ingredients ; two and one half dozen "prep" credits, 
one letter of introduction, and a half gallon of friendly advice. Have on hand a 
nev\' trunk, a leather suit-case, two suits of store clothes, one pair of squeaky- 
shoes, holding all in place with an apron string. Place the ingredients in a well 
filled office and allow to stand for three hours, or until no trace of "argent" re- 
mains. Soak well in salt tears. Expose to the sarcasm of the upper classmen. 
Serve with green sauce. 

Sophomore "a la consume". 
From one Greek philosopher extract the brains. Care should be taken not 
to injure the flagrant conceit which gives the peculiar flavor to this delicacy. 
Obtain a covering of green checked serge and in this envelope the preparation. 
Garnish with one small sized head-piece, one pipe, well-smoked ; one red tie, and 
two green socks. Serve hot in tans — size ten. 

Senior a la Bethany. 
Have ready a pruning knife and a board made from three shanks of fac- 
ulty timber. Obtain a well developed product of the tree of learning and make 
an incision into the brain. Examine closely the quality of the grey matter and if 
there remains any undeveloped cells, massage with a mixture of condensed 
Science, Philosophy, or Mathematics. Place upon the head in such a way as to 
cover all traces of the incision, a flat black four-cornered cap and surround the 
body with a flowing gown of the same color. In order to get rid of any super- 
fluous knowledge, place the product upon a platform and allow it to cut the air 
briskily with sharp words, accompanied by a rotary motion of the arms. Two 
treatments are generally sufficient to remove all traces of knowledge. If the prod- 
uct undergoes all these treatments successfully it is now ready to be surrounded 
by an atmosphere of dignity and followed by the awe-stricken gaze of the under- 
graduates. Be hold the finished product ! It must be permitted to walk unmo- 
lested where it wills. It must have full right of way. It's decision must be taken 
as final. If questions or hard problems arise, crying for solutions ; let the Senior 
raise his eloquent voice, stretch forth his mighty arm, and declare the TRUTH. 



Patfe One Handred and Twentj-Seren 



Why They Like Bethany 



President Cramblet "Such great Opportunities." 

Prof. Johnson "Cool and Nice." 

Prof. Finley "The piisnal spirits hcah." 

Prof. Workman "The new Science Hall." 

Prof. Taylor "Its marvelous historic atmosphere."' 

Prof. Mahaffy "Its exquisite beauty." 

Prof. Bourne "The sublime mountains." 

Prof. McCausland "Like it a zcholc lot." 

Prof. Moos "No more antedeluvian yokes." 

Prof. Deutsch "'')pportunities for Biological Research." 

Prof. -Atcheson - . . "Oand Alodel Department." 

Prof. Perry "The paved streets." 

Prof. Hill "Its productive farm." 

Things Which No One Ever Found Out 

Whn put the sninke-nut in Phillips Hall. 

Where the centre of gravitv of the student body is located. 

How a man can take five studies and spend two hours per day on each, 
spend one hour and a half in partaking his meals, sleep at least eight hours per 
day. exercise two hours, use at least one half hour for washing and dressing, biz 
one hour, attend committee meetings one hour, spend at east two hours with 
literary, fraternity, or home ; and explain the length of day in Betliany. 

W'hy the prayers of the "Boosters Club" were not answered. 

Who stacked the parlors. 

Any question that had not been settled by the Seniors of Bethany College. 

\Miat made the "Bizites" so thick at the hall when rules were so strict. 

Feb. 1919. — We are sorry to sav the pipe orgaij has succumbed to a 
severe attack of Bronchitis aggravated by the incessant demands made upon its 
voice. 

L. H. — Yes, T think sixteen is quite the proper age for a girl to begin to 
think seriously of selecting a husband. It is unwise to delay this important de- 
cision too long. 

\'. R. — Yes, blue will lie the popular shade during the examination season. 

jNI. C. — Yes, a "biz" note may be answered in the affirmative. 

Fresh. — Bandages were quite in vogue during the season of flag rush. 

O. T. B. — Read the "Silent Players" if you want to fathom the mystery 
of the disappearance of the orchestra. 

Hall Girls. — Parlor doors were made to stand open. Chairs must not be 
moved. Lace curtains should hang in undisturbed uniformity. Molasses applied 
to hard-wood floors adds to their polish. 

Page One Handred and Twenty-Eight 



Precepts of Dorcilla 



Prologue. 

1. My daughter, wouldst thou be popular with men? Then listen to my 
counsel, for of men have I known upwards of one hundred and five and ten, and 
they were much alike. 

2. For man is an insufficient creature, and to lead him on, is easy. 

Chapter I. 

1. Hear then, that to have a pretty face is all-sufficient for the wisest and 
best of them follow the lure of a pretty eye. 

2. Howsoever, if thou art blessed with brains, hide thy light under a 
bushel, and act as thou knowest not — 

3. For man liketh not to find his match in a woman. 

-i. Yea, though he tells thee jokes, thou hadst heard unto the third and 
fourth time, laugh yet again, and fail never to see the point. 

0. Though he bore holes into thee with tales of his college pranks, com- 
mit not the error or relating anv of thy adventures. 

6. Lead him to tell of his infant days, and keep thyself awake by watching 
how his lower jaw moveth. 

7. For naught interests him but what concerneth himself, and so that he 
doeth all the relating, he will think, "What a good conversationalist is she." 
x\nd of thee he will say to his brother, "Lo, she is a good talker, and all-fired sym- 
pathetic." 

8. Mark a man how he regardeth his sister, even so will he regard his 
wife. 

9. Judge not a man entirely upon the canclv and flowers he sends her. 
(Look at Barger). 

10. Verily, I say unto three, put no faith in the aitections of the Kappa 
Alpha who liveth on the same street where thou resideth. It is too convenient. 

11. But I do aver, if thou liveth in Wellsburg, and yet he Cometh often to 
see thee, and taketh thee to lectures and to formals, then let thy heart flutter for 
thee. 

Chapter II. 

1. I warn thee, daughter, watch him how he asketh thee to go somewhere 
with thee. 

2. Never will he commit himself at first, never does he say. "Will you 
go with me?" 

3. Nay, verily, he sayeth, "Got anything doin on the 10th?" 

-i. And when thou hast committed thyself, and there is no backing out, 
then will he say, "All right, there's a lecture on, I'll be around at seven." 

•5. Moreover, judge not a man by some of the foolish things he does. 

6. For not every man who walketh in the sunshine weareth a yellow rain 
coat like Prof. Deutsch. 

7. Even as a steady diet of syrup and honey, is the man whosoever pay- 
eth inane flattery. 

8. Note a man when he raveth over thy chum — 

9. If he saith heartily, "That's right" — Rest at ease. 

10. But if he ansvi'ereth naught, walk carefully : either he liketh her not, 
or they have at one time had a case. 

11. Behold, if one cometh to thee with his photograph and saith, "Look 
you — is this like me?" Disturb not thyself over the answer, he but covets thy 
photograph in exchange. 

13. Never-the-less, not-with-standing, but — when one beggest earnestly 

Page One Hunclrecl and Twenty-Nine 



and with a deal of fine speech for th'- photograph, be not persuaded, he asketh 
suavely, because he is practiced and he but desireth to add thine to his collection. 

The Epilogue. 

1. Therefore take heed, my daughter, and be not pufifed up when one 
speaketh to the on the corridor. 

2. But if he smile at thee in the dining-room over the Review of Re- 
views — know that he really recognizeth thee. 

The Unexpected Took Place Once 

froi. Gay — jMade a chapel speech and forgot to rub his hands. 

Prof. Finlev came to class without a school-bag. 

Jr'ortenberger missed class. 

Jr'rof. Bourne forgot to give a lecture in the class-room. 

President stayed at home ten whole days. 

Velma and Onward separated. 

Miss IMcCausland says "I like it a whole lot Jimmy." 

Prof. Hill makes a short trip out of Bethany. 

Prof. Perry dismissed class. 

The "Gym" floor scrubbed. 

Prof. Taylor forgot his handkerchief. 

The heat comes on. 

The pipe-organ is in perfect ordor. 

A. L. I., N. L. S., and O. L. S. have full programs. 

Prvor goes nut of his own room and attends a lecture. 

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for Several H.easons : 

1 st — We cater to a discriminating trade. 

2nd — We use the product of only the best manufacturers. 

3rd — It is an established fact that our footwear has a fine reputation. 

4th — Our stock is so large that most everyone can be fitted on sight. 

5th — None but capable salespeople who are instructed to miss a sale rather 
than misfit a customer. 

Men's Shoes $3 to $7. Ladies' SHoes $2.50 to $6. 

Spring Styles Now Ready. We solicit your trade strictly on the superior 
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Pa^e One Hundred and Thirty 



SUBJECTS FOR THE MUSEUM 

**** 

Prof. Perry's collar. 

Bethany Trolley Car. 

Smoke-outs. 

The Greek Department. 

Prof. Taylor's handkerchief. -• 

Phillip's Hall Nunnery. 

The Faculty's Criticisms on Senior Orations. 

The "Prep" Department. 

Bethany House. 

College Spirit. 

College Clock. 

Bethany "Biz." 

Ossolian Literary Society. 

Bethany Hack. 

The Boosters Club. 

Ten o'clock finds girls in serenades on the third floor. While they are 
held in good taste by some they are held as undeniably rediculous by others. 

How to write eft'ective poetry for the Collegian. 
Gather together one-fourth peck well rhymed words, add two yards of 
meter in season, four dozen commas, together with eight periods ; add one atom 
of horse-sense, if procurable, and pad to the desired size. Shake well and set 
aside to cool. Slice into thin stanzas and hand out with frosted exclamations. 

Prof. Deutsch — "The Profs, in Waynesburg are payed per month, but the 
Profs, in Bethany are not payed per year, per month, per week, or per day, but 
• — Perhaps. 

In Hebrew Class: — 

Mr. Carman — "Professor, I can't get these old verbs. 

Prof. Finley — "You cannot expect a baby to walk in one day can you? 

First student — "They say that "Billy" Sunday cannot get a thing done 
for himself in the city of Wheeling. He cannot even get a shave witliout going 
to Shadyside or some other near by town. 

Second student — "Why how is that?" 

First student — "Well you see that the barbers dow: there will not work 
on Sundav." 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-One 



Of Local Interest 



Prof. Gay (to Miss Mahaffey) — "Is Prof. Deutsch going to Waynes- 
burgh?" 

Miss Mahaffey — "No he is Hke Roosevelt, holding out for the third 
term." 

How would you like to hai't seen Bittner the morning he woke up and 
found himself milking on his lantern? 

Prof. Gay (to Mr. McEvoy) — "Can you cash a check for one dollar?" 

Mr. -McEvoy— ".-J Dollar!'!!! 

Prof. Gay — "Yes, I never carry much money with me, I am afraid some 
of the other professors will ask me to loan it to them." 

' X^ives of Carman and Glenn oft remind us 
We could make our lives sublime. 
And by asking foolish questions. 
Take all the teachers time." 

Pres. Cramblet — "Is Lape pledged to the Betas?" 

A Student — "Yes." 

President — "^^'ell he will sleep easier now." 

Prof. Workman (in Physics) — "Mr. Johnston what pressure did you get 
for the water at the dam?" 

]\Ir. Johnston — "I didn't work the dam problem." 

Pres. Crambelt — "Is j\Ir. Smith really married?" 

Student — "Yes." 

President — "1 am mighty glad of it. It does nie as much good as when 
I got marric-d myself. I won't have to bother with him in the faculty any more." 

L^i'ooks — "Thank Heavens I am not a preacher!" 

Wray — "Thank Heavens you're not.' 

Walter Cope ( Philosophizing) — "When two railroad locomotives come 
together we say it is a collision : but when two babies come together we say it is 
twins. 

Who saw the sick kittens leaning against hot bricks in Wheeling? 

Prof. Perry — "I never knew what the expression reading between lines 
meant until I started to teach latin." 

Freshman — "Say what class is Carman in?'' 

t^fof. ( ?) — "In a class by himself." 

A Senior once said — "I don't mind the fellow who invented Titramethoxy- 
rfenzylisoginoline, but wait until I catch the nrope that found Parahydroxymetome- 
thoxyallylbenzene" — then he died of lock-jaw. 

Saint Peter — "Who are you ?" 

Applicant — "A student of Bethany college." 

Saint Peter — "Did you buy a Bethenian?" 

Applicant— "No." 

Sairit Peter — "You can change climates." 

THE SE\'EN WONDERS OF BETHANY. 

1. Our museum. 

2. Prof. Deutsch's walk. 

3. Phillip's Hall rules. 

4. The orchestra. 

5. The College Shop ( ?) 

6. Fried potatoes three times per day. 

7. The line distinguishing faculty from freshmen. 
Opportunity knocks but once. (Other knockers please copy.) 

Page One Hundred and Thirty-T«o 



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These books have been regularly approved by the Educational Committee of the International 
Sunday-School Association. Examination questions may be secured from Dr. Franklin McElfresh 
National Superintendent of Teacher-training, Hartford Bldg., Chicago, or from the Interdenom- 
inational State Sunday-School Secretary of your State. 

PRICES 

SINGLE COPY IN QUANTITIES (express not prepaid) 

Manila binding, postpaid 30c Manila binding 25c 

Cloth binding, postpaid _ _ _ . . 50c Cloth . 40c 

Order all booKs from THe Sta.ridard Pxiblishing Co., NintH .Avenue 
and Cutter Street, Cincinnati, O. 

VII 



Patterson & Co. 

ICE CREAM 

of all kinds 

for all occasions 

Candies and Confections 



Both Phones 

706 Charles St. 

WELLSBURQ = W. VA. 



RO D A RS 




If you want a KODAK or any SUP- 
PLIES, Films or Plates Developed, 
Printed, Mounted, come to ELSON. 

The Students' Druggist j 

The Rexall Druggist j 

The Reliable Druggist j 

Lig-ofetfs and Huyler's Chocolates. 

JOHN R. ELSON 

Wellshurg, W. Va. 



A. H. PETTING 

Manufacturer of 

Greek Letter 
Fraternity Jewelry 

213 N. Liberty St., Baltimore, Md. 
Factory, 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any 

fraternity member through the 

secretary of the chapter. 

Special designs and estimates fur- 
nished on class pins, rings, 
medals for athletic 
meets, etc. 



CT. CfiJ. Jaaunxer 
vTine c)ianos 

dteiryvya^ ar\a. ^c;^tr\er c; iaryos 

Sole SveppcsentatiVe for y'iai\oia 
ai>^ a Jai>ola S ianos. 

I4IO-I4I8 MarKet St. 

^VHEEIvING, ^V. VA. 

W. A. MILLIGAN, 

Pres. and Ms'r- 



VIII 



The Staiidairdl of 



Wa 



fl 




AsK your dealer to snow you the regular 
Safety and Self-Filling types. 



LEoWatemainiCoo 17^ 



Broao 




CORK 



Xhe ball tHe players 'want; 
it ii^creases tHeir batting; 
they can tHro'w more ac- 
curately ai:&<l it is easier to 
Hax\dle. 



The Spalding 




4i 



Official National League' 



Adopted by tKe N&tional 
League and will be used 
exclusively by tKe Leag'ue 
and in tbe '^Vorld >Series 
for tKe next t'wenty years. 



Cork Center 

Base ball 



A, G. SPALDING & BROS. 



608 Wood Street 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 



IX 



High Grade Tailoring 

at Popular Price 

We can make your clothes for busi- 
ness wear, semi-dress or full dress in the 
latest approved fashions. Also top coats, 
fancy vests and outing and sporting gar- 
ments of every dercription. 

See our line before you buy. 

Suits-Overcoats to measure 
$15, $18, $20, $22, $25 

Fit guaranteed. Pressing free. 



Scotch Woolen Mills Go. 

Leading Popular Priced Tailors 
1316 Market street 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



&/o 



Geo. W. Stamm, Prop. 



Rates $2.00 to 
$2.50 per day 
American Plan 



'ee/c„^, m ^i». 



Vak 



Val 



aes 



B. &B. 



This is more than a Pittsburgh store. 
It is an institution organized to supply 
the Dry Goods and Wearing Apparel 
need of the people everywhere in these 
prosperous central states. 

If you can come to the store person- 
ally you'll fee a big thriving merchandise 
emporium devoted to goods of the bet- 
ter sort. For those who cannot easily 
come to Pittsburgh we've provided a 
beautiful illustrated catalog. 

We would like to mail you one. 

Will you send your name? 

Boggs & Buhl 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Wellsburg Banking and 
Trust Company 

Capital $100,000.00 

Surplus and Profits .... 50,000.00 

Does a general banking business. 
Invites your patronage. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Charles Street 



Robt. Scott Lumber Co 

Dealer in 
all kinds of 

LUMBER 




U'U 



Hemlock, White and Yellow Pine, 
Norway Pine and Spruce, Poplar 
and Hardwoods, Lath and Shin- 
gles, Sash, Doors, Cabinet Mater- 
ials, Pelt, Roofing, and Building 

Commerce and 8th St. 

WELLSBURQ, W. VA. 



tstabllshed IS72 



Excelled by None 



E. A. WRIGHT 

Engraver - Printer - Stationer 

Programs, Menus, Fraternity Inserts and 
Stationery. Commencement Invitations and 
Dance Invitations. Complete facilities for 
turning out College Publications. Special 
rates to Fraternities and Class Committees. 
Before ordering elsewhere compare samples 
and prices. Special designs submitted for 
special occasions. 



Class Pins, Visiting Cards, Wedding An- 
nouncements, and Invitations. Modern Ad- 
vertising Novelties, Art Calendars — steel en- 
graved and hand painted. Photo-Engraving 
and Half Tone Work. Photogravure Litho- 
graphing. 

E. A. Wright Bank Note Co. 

Bank Note and General Engravers 

Stock Certificates, Bonds and Securities of 
Money Value (Engraved accordidg to Stock 
Exchange requirements). Diplomas, Checks, 
Bill of Exchange, Drafts, Railroad Passes. 

1108 Chestnut Street, PHILADELPHIA 



Some will follow a mercantile 

career. When you start in 

business remember 

The 
John S. NaylorCo. 

Importers, Jobbers and 
Manufacturers of 

Dry Goods and Notions 

John S. Naylor, President 

Jos. R. Naylor, Sec. and Treas. 
A. G. Naylor, Gen. Mgr. 

H. L. Henderson, Asst. Mgr. 

1400-1402-1404-1406-1408 Main Street 
WHEELING, W. VA. 

New York Office— 101 Franklin St. 







MEECHAMT^ 

BETHANY, W. VA. 



35 



Groceries, Dry Goods, Hardware 

Schrafft's Chocolates. 

Hole- Proof Hosiery. 

Athletic Supplies. 



XI 



Frencn Dry Gleanlno 
PresslnoandRcDalrino 
Suits Made to Order 

EDWARD 

The Tailor 

BETHANY, W. VA. 

mmmmmmmmmm. 

GO TO 

GIBSONS 

For Everything 
and Anything 



A big and complete line of Gents' 
Furnishings. 



A full line of the National Biscuit 
Company's goods 

ALWAYS FRESH 



35 Main St., Bethany, W.Va. 



EMiG BROS. 



Clothiers 

Tailors 

Furnishers 



A 



Charles St. Wellsbur^, W. Va. 
GO TO 

Moore's 
Ice Cream Parlor 




For Good Sandwiches 
and Lunches 

Main St., BETHANY, W. VA. 



XII 



Sy^e Tndispensible It^dy Books 

^=*^TeacIiers! Superintendents! Bible Stadents! Christian Workers! EvantJelists! Yoa need these boots. ^ 'I P 

No matter how useful your lesson helps may be, this Bible study library is a daily necessity. A permanent 1^ I T 

and Dnequaled storehouse and encyclopedia of Bible facts, ready to answer your questions at any time. W I \3 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Average size of volumes, 9-''8i6jsiI V* Former Price $50 OO 




Cruden's Complete Concordance. The alphabet of Bi- 
ble!use. Even the riches of the Bible are half useless 
if you cannot tell where to find them. 756 pages. For- 
mer price $1.50. 

Jamiegon, Fausset and Brown's Commentary (2 vols.) 
Covers both Old and New Testaments, elucidating diffi- 
cult passages, historical illusions, unfamiliar custom'^, 
and so on: a massive storehouse of authoritative but lucid 
notes, concise but pregnant. 1380 pages. Former 
price $9. 

Smith's Dictionary of the Bible. A great standard 
classic, never superseded. All serious Bible users need 
their Smith only (ess than their Cruden. 1024 pages, 
finely illustrated. Former price $4.50. 

Faueset's Critical and Expository Cyclopedia. A mas- 
terpiece of compressed riches; 3700 articles of enormous 
variety, condensed yet completeand thorough, handling 
both historical and ex positional questions with the 
highest scholarship and grasp. 75) 3-colums pages, 600 
illustrations. Former price $5. 

Kitto's Illustrated Bible History. A brilliant work of 
immense popularity, filling up the gaps in the Scripture 
narrative and completing it in a rounded historic unity 
to the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus. 736 2-column 
pages. 220 illustrations. Former price $4.50. 

Edersheim's Life and Times of Jetui the Messifth. 2 
vols. A vivid portrait of the society, life, and intel- 
lectual religious development of Christ's Palestine, to 
serve as a background for His own portrait; by a world- 
famous Christian Jewish scholar. 1,524 pages. Former 
price $6. 



Conybeare and Howson'i Life and Epistles of St. Paul. 

A splendid work of enduring popularity and authority; 
a life-like picture of the great apostle and his work, an 
acute and illuminating commentary on his epistles, 
with a style at once full of fine scholarship and of liter- 
ary charm. 917 pages. Many fine illustrations, maps, 
charts, etc. Former price $4.^0. 

Thompson's The Land and the Book, '.i vols. The mod- 
ern Holy Land as illuminating the ancient and the Bible. 
An invaluable and charming classic, by a great mission- 
ary forty-five years in Syria. Three volumes averaging 
»i64 pages eaoh. beautifully printed and bound; 6 maps 
over 100 fine full page wood cuts, besides several hun- 
dred in the text. Former price $12' 

Josephus' Complete Work*. The priceless writings of 
the greatest Jewish leader and statesman in the gener- 
ation after Christ; History and Antiquities of the Jews; 
the Roman-Jewish War. which stamped out the Jewish 
nationality in blood and fire. 978 pages. Former price $4. 

Sanford's Concise Cyclopedia of Religious Knowledge. 

A surprising treasury of information regarding Church 
and Bible History. Names, Place<i and Customs, Creeds 
and Sects, the early Church, Story of the Reformation. 
Young Peoples' Societies, Cathedrals. Churches, etc. 
985 pages, beautifully illustrated. Former price $3. 

Gilbert*s 3,000 Selected Quotations. A gold mine to 
speakers and writers. Pithy and eloquent passages 
from the literature of all airea. with complete index of 
authors and subjects. Undenominational, but evangel- 
ical. 681 pages. Former price $2. 



Every book newly 
made and hand- 
somely bound in 
cloth. 



MONTHLY PAYMENT PRICES CASH PRICES 



Complete Set 


15 Vol., $17.00 


15 volumes, $15.00 


Choice of 


12 ' 


15.00 


12 


12.50 


Choice of 


lO ' 


14.00 


10 


11.50 


Choice of 


8 ' 


12.00 


8 


9.50 


Choice of 


6 ' 


lO.OO 


6 


8.00 


Choice of 


4 ' 


8.00 


4 


6.00 


Choice of 


2 ' 


4.00 


2 


3.50 



Money cheerfully 
refunded if books 
are not entirely sat- 
isfactory. 



HOW TO ORDER. On the monthly Payment Plan we require an advance of $2.00 with order, and promise to i)ay $1.00 
monthly until payment is completed. Books forwarded on receipts of cash price or first installment of $2.00. Customers 
pay freight or express charges. Customers at remote points or in foreign co mtries desiring us to prepay will send 30c 
per volume to cover cost of postage or express. Safe delivery guaranteed to any station in the country or to any mail 
point in the world. We will take back books that ore not satisfactory in ten days after examination and return money, 
deducting only the return transportation charges. As to our reliability, we refer you to the publisher of this magazine, 
or to any commercial agency. Established 1866. S. S. SCRANTON CO., Hartford, Conn. 



XIII 



^ethani/ boj/s 
send i/our iauncirt/ 
to the Colle£^e 
Ulaundrj/ and 
save monei/ 



t 



J. L. Lloyd Leese 




COPVRIGHT 

A pa.E,c 



Quality is what the "ZilHken" imprint 
means on a jewelry box. For 36 years 
I have tried to make the name "Zilliken" 
mean to people in this vicinity w^hat 
'Tiffany" means to the New Yorker — 
the very best quality and value that is 
possible to give for the money you 
spend. 

HENRY ZII.I.IKCN 

Je'virelex-* Optometrist 



E. E. Hillman 

QUALITY GOODS 
ONLY 

Gold and Silversmith House, 
23 Eleventh Street 

WHEELING, W. VA. 

25/^ discount on Silverware 



Chas. n. Beall 

Candidate for 

Sheriff 

of Brooke Couuty 



Your vote and influence solicited 



XIV 



- i 

Poughkeepsie Flag Co 

Manufacturers of I 

Felt Flags and Pillows 




We Make All Pennants on Sale in the College Book Store. 
Call in and See the Line of Goods. 



BETHANY, W. VA. 



Barg'ains in BooKs 

We have thousands of books, both new and second-hand. CATALOG 
FREE. We list here a few NEW BOOKS AT NEW PRICES. Satis- 
faction Guaranteed. 

ALL SENT POSTPAID 

Begbie— Twice Born Men 60c 

Bowes— Topical Outlines of Bible Themes 60c 

Gordon — Ministry of the Spirit 60c 

Pierson — Many Infallable Proofs 60c 

Van Dyke-Sermons to Young Men 60c 

Fairbairn — Philosophy of Christian Experience. • • .$1.15 

Sanday — Outlines of life of Christ 60c 

Clarke— Sixty Years with the Bible 60c 

Dods -Bible, Its Origin and Nature 60c 

Clow- Cross in Christian Experience 60c 

Send For Catalog Today 

the: WESTMINSTER PRESS 

■W. p. BLESSING. Mgr. 

508 S. WetbasH Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



XV 



511. fm. giiiff 



er 



\lOorS^ counts. (Slsf? an^j&oc 
about my WorKmaT^snip 



COLLEGE MEN'S 
SUPPLIES 



Hart, Schaffner & Marx 
Clothes 

Walk-Over Shoes 

Eagle Shirts 

Young's Hats 

LeMarr's Cavats 



642-644 Charles Street 
WELLSBURG, W. VA. 



What is the difference between a 

railroad during a rate war, 

and a meat man ? 




The railroad meets the cut, but the 
meat man cuts the meat ! 

CHOICE MEATS IN A HURRY 



GEO. M. >VEST 



Home Cured Meats 



Wellsbnrg, W. Va. 



John G. ftrcher 

D.D.S. M.D. 

Dentist and Orthodontist 

807 Schmulbach Bldg. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



XVI 



Our Shipments to Bethany 

Are not many, but those that have received goods from us are well 
pleased. Possibly this pleasure would be yours should you order 
anything in our line. 

Trunks, Traveling Bags, Suit Cases, Ladies' Hand 
Bags, Velvet Leather (ooze). 

Our line of Men's Pocketbooks is complete— all made of best 
leather. 



Altoona Leather Store 

1410 Eleventh Avenue 
ALTOONA, PA. 



Patronize Our 
Advertisers 



t 



They Helped Us. 
Let's Help Them. 



i 



Just Say You Are 
From Bethany. 



Incorporated 1912 

3viXmnB ^talr lank 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 



Capital $100,000 



Surplus $20,000 



Officers 

President, C. B. Reeves. 

Vice President, W. B. Taylor. 

Cashier, S. S. Hedges 



The newest and best bank in Brooks 
county. Profit and protection in every 
appointment. 4% interest paid on time 
deposits and savings accounts 

The Servants of All for the 
Service of All 



XVII 




How the Fox Caught the Preacher 

"When the Fox arrived I had no more Idea of buying It than I had of buying a real 
live Fox forapet. butwhen I begantooperateltjsoonfoundthatlthad very win- 
ning ways, and the longer I used It the better 1 liked tt and now — The Fox has 
Caught the Preacher." 

The Fox Typewriter has "Caught the Preacher" from Maine to California 
and from the Great Lakes to the Gulf. 

in every city and town, among every Denomination and every Nationality, 
the Fox Typewriter Is known to the Minister as "The Ministers' Typewriter." 
Why? Because **Tbe Fox has Caught the Preacher." Caught 
him by Its Free Trial. Captivated him by Its "winning ways" — Its light touch — 
Its easy action — its full visibility — its durability and Us dependability — by Its 
special Ministers' price and by Its easy terms. All this Is made possible by the 
two hobbies of Mr. W. R. Fox — the Church and the Fox Typewriter — to each of 
which he has devoted a lifetime of service. 

This is the New Fox No. 24 

Nothing equals our New Ministers* Model. It is a typewriter 
that will meet the approval ol the most critical operator. A 
single demonstration will convince you ol this. We will 
make It at our expense if you will give us your permission 




Ten Days Free Trial 
to Ministers 



Dale- 



J9_ 



FOX TYPEWRITER CO., 
87O3-8903 Front St., 

Grand Rapids., Mich. 

Dear Sirs: Please sen<l me a copy of your cat- 
alog and write me your special O0er to ministers on 
the new Fox ytsible Tupewrileft Ministers' Model: 

NAME 



Address 

Denomination— 



H35 



XVIII 




E HAVE CONTRACTED this 
year Class Annuals for some of 
the leading Colleges and High 
Schools of the country. They 
have placed their contracts with us after a 
thoro investigation of our product, and have 
the assurance that their Annuals will be of 
that particular standard demanded by schools 
of the present day. 

^ Our facilities have recently been consider- 
ably augmented by the addition of more floor 
space and modern equipment, and we claim, 
with modest pride, one of Ohio's best printing 
plants. 

^ We'll be pleased to estimate for you any 
printed matter — from the tasty, delicate station- 
ery to the modern booklet or catalog. 

The Callihan & Stottlemire Co. 

Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Ohio 



XIX 




XX 




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